Program

Take advantage of a wide range of topics and get tips on healthy living.

This was the program for Health Matters 2018, which has now concluded.

Time

Session

Program

Speaker

Location

8:30 a.m.

MSM

Med School Morning Registration Opens

 

Dean’s Lawn

9:00 a.m.

 

Registration Opens

 

Dean’s Lawn

9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

 

Health Pavilion

 

Dean’s Lawn

9:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

 

Med School Morning

You want to go to med school: Is a career in health care right for you?

“I’m not a doctor, but I play one on TV”: Real life ER physicians examine the TV show “ER”

Ten thousand hours: the making of a biomedical scientist

 

Iris C. Gibbs, MD,

S.V. Mahadevan, MD,

Jill Helms, DDS, PhD

 

Dean’s Lawn

10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

 

Food truck lunch options: Akita Sushi, Capelo’s Barbecue, Kabob Trolly, Little Green Cyclo, Taqueria Angelica’s, and Blisspops.

 

Adjacent to Health Pavilion

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1

Listen and learn: the latest in hearing science

Matt Fitzgerald, PhD

Li Ka Shing | LK130

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1

When does an obsession become a disorder?

Carolyn Rodriguez, MD, PhD

Li Ka Shing | LK120

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1

Using your genome sequence and big data to manage your health

Mike Snyder, PhD

Li Ka Shing | Berg Hall

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1

The pressures of high blood pressure

Randall Stafford, MD, PhD

Clark Center Auditorium

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

1

Don’t miss a beat: the latest in heart health

Jeffrey Teuteberg, MD

Li Ka Shing | LK101/102

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

 

Session Break

 

 

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

2

How the stroke stopwatch was shattered

Greg Albers, MD

Jeremy Heit, MD, PhD

Li Ka Shing | LK101/102

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

2

Making good choices in tough times

 

Stephanie Harman, MD

 

Li Ka Shing | LK130

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

2

Immunotherapy: using your body’s natural defenses to fight cancer

Crystal Mackall, MD

Li Ka Shing | Berg Hall

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

2

Keepin’ it chill: helping kids stay cool under pressure

Manpreet Singh, MD, MS

Clark Center Auditorium

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

2

Fueling the cures of tomorrow

 

Will Talbot, PhD

 

Li Ka Shing | LK120

2:00 p.m.

 

Health Pavilion Closes

 

Dean’s Lawn

Health Talks

When does an obsession become a disorder?
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Imagine being unable to stop yourself from washing your hands a hundred times a day. Or living in mountains of clutter because you’re unable to discard (or recycle, sell, or give away) your possessions. At some point in their lives, one in 50 Americans will be diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). And some estimate up to a quarter of those with OCD also suffer from hoarding disorder. Dr. Rodriguez will describe the most up-to-date treatment options for these often-misunderstood conditions and explain why she’s optimistic about the future.


The pressures of high blood pressure
Professor of Medicine

Even though Americans spend almost $10 billion a year on drugs to treat it, high blood pressure rates are soaring while guidelines keep recommending lower and lower goals for blood pressure control. Dr. Stafford will discuss how lifestyle changes are the most effective and safest “drug” to treat a condition that kills more than a thousand people every day. You’ll learn about the relationship between high blood pressure and chronic conditions like diabetes, obesity, and heart disease and get practical tips on how to improve your health and well-being.


Listen and learn: the latest in hearing science
Assistant Professor of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery

“What did you say?” How often do you hear that question? Approximately one-third of people over 65 experience disabling hearing loss, and it often occurs so gradually they don’t even realize it. Stanford’s Chief of Audiology Dr. Fitzgerald will talk about common causes of hearing loss and the best ways to keep your hearing as you age. He’ll also describe the work of the Stanford Initiative to Cure Hearing Loss. This ambitious team of more than 100 scientists is working on novel research that holds the promise to restore lost hearing, quiet tinnitus, and improve balance.



Using your genome sequence and big data to manage your health
Stanford W. Ascherman, MD, FACS, Professor of Genetics
Director, Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine

For a few hundred dollars, you can have your entire genome sequenced. Then what? If you knew more about your genes, would you change your life? Would you eat differently? Would you get a less stressful job? Dr. Snyder, a pioneer in the field who actually learned he had type-2 diabetes by sequencing himself, will tell us what we all need to know about sequencing. He’ll describe what the genome is, what it does, and how affordable sequencing technologies are transforming our ability to predict and prevent disease.


Don’t miss a beat: the latest in heart health
Associate Professor of Medicine

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first successful U.S. human heart transplant by the late Stanford cardiothoracic surgeon Norman Shumway, MD, PhD. We’ve come a long way since then. Renowned cardiologist and transplant specialist Dr. Teuteberg will talk about the latest innovations in cardiovascular medicine. He’ll also tell you what you can do—and what you should avoid—to reduce your risk and stay out of the operating room.



How the stroke stopwatch was shattered
Coyote Foundation Professor
Clinical Assistant Professor of Radiology

Would you know if you’re having a stroke? Every two seconds, someone on the planet has one. And when it happens, every second counts. No two people know this better than Drs. Albers and Heit. They’ve developed imaging software and minimally-invasive techniques that give neurointerventional surgeons up to three times as much time to treat patients with ischemic stroke before the brain is damaged. In this talk, they’ll discuss the latest advancements in stroke treatment. They’ll also give you practical tips on how to reduce your risk and recognize the symptoms of a stroke.


Immunotherapy: using your body’s natural defenses to fight cancer
Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Stanford
Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine
Director, Stanford Center for Cancer Cell Therapy
Associate Director, Stanford Cancer Institute

Immunotherapy for cancer is all over the news these days. But what is it? How does it work? What types of cancers respond? Is it safe? Is it different for kids than for adults? Dr. Mackall, a leader in this fast-growing field, will discuss how Stanford physicians and researchers are harnessing the immune system to fight cancer more effectively and with fewer side effects. She’ll talk about the latest treatments, tell us what’s in the pipeline, and discuss the challenges of turning promising discoveries into new therapies.


Keepin’ it chill: helping kids stay cool under pressure
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Director, Pediatric Mood Disorders Program

Today’s kids are growing up in a fast-paced and hyper-connected world, especially here in Silicon Valley. So how can we help our kids handle the stresses they face every day? Dr. Singh specializes in identifying and treating children, adolescents, and young adults with or at risk for mood disorders. She provides education to patients and families about warning signs and has developed strategies based on neuroscience to help youth adapt to stress and build resilience. In this hopeful presentation, she will discuss how building healthy generations can help us recognize and destigmatize mental health issues. She’ll also provide simple solutions and tools to help parents and children cope in a complex world.


Making good choices in tough times
Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine

Patients have to make some of the most difficult and important decisions of their lives when they’re incredibly stressed and vulnerable. Dr. Harman, the founding medical director of Palliative Care Services at Stanford Health Care, will discuss how doctors, patients, and families can work together to make tough decisions that are not just based on the disease, but on the whole person. From diagnosis to end-of-life care, she’ll explain why you should discuss treatment goals early and often. She’ll also teach us how to advocate for ourselves and for others.


Fueling the cures of tomorrow
Senior Associate Dean for Graduate Education and Postdoctoral Affairs
Professor of Developmental Biology

It’s a lot easier to fix a car when you understand how it works. The same goes for people. Every day at Stanford Medicine, our researchers are discovering how our bodies work and what breaks down when they don’t. In this talk, Dr. Talbot will explain how early-stage research can exponentially accelerate our understanding of human biology. He’ll also give examples of how basic biology breakthroughs have led to real-world cures and explain why so many new drugs fail before they ever get to market.

Med School Morning

Thank you for your interest in Med School Morning. Due to a robust response, we have reached our maximum capacity for this program. 

Med School Morning is an interactive and educational session that explores what it's like to work in health care. Sessions include:

You want to go to med school: Is a career in health care right for you?
Iris C. Gibbs, MD
Associate Dean for MD Admissions

“I’m not a doctor, but I play one on TV”: Real life ER physicians examine the TV show “ER”
S.V. Mahadevan, MD
Professor of Emergency Medicine

Ten thousand hours: the making of a biomedical scientist
Jill Helms, DDS, PhD
Professor of Surgery

Passport to the Pavilion
Visit the Health Pavilion, a collection of interactive, hands-on exhibits and activities for the whole family. We’ll give you a map and a passport to visit at least three stations and then exchange your completed passport for a Stanford Med School Morning certificate of participation. Click here for more information on the Health Pavilion.