Course work

In addition to their 6 units of foundation coursework, students are required to complete 6 units of Global Health coursework.

The list of courses below is not all-inclusive.  The student, research advisor/mentor, and co-directors will design a program tailored to the student’s interests, goals, and background.

  • GH students are required to complete a core course requirement. This requirement can be fulfilled by any one of the following eleven core courses:
    • ANTHRO 216: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 116)
      An introduction to numeric methods in Anthropology and related fields employing the Data Desk statistics package to test hypotheses and to explore data. Examples chosen from the instructor¿s research and other relevant projects. No statistical background is necessary, but a working knowledge of algebra is important. Topics covered include: Frequency Distributions; Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion, and Variability; Probability and Probability Distributions; Statistical Inference, Comparisons of Sample Means and Standard Deviations; Analysis of Variance; Contingency Tables, Comparisons of Frequencies; Correlation and Regression; Principal Components Analysis; Discriminant Analysis; and Cluster Analysis. Grading based on take-home problem sets.
      Units: 5

    • HRP 225: Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies
      Intermediate-level. The skills to design, carry out, and interpret epidemiologic studies, particularly of chronic diseases. Topics: epidemiologic concepts, sources of data, cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, sampling, measures of association, estimating sample size, and sources of bias. Prerequisite: A basic/introductory course in statistics or consent of instructor.
      Units: 3

    • HRP 226: Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods
      The principles of study design, measurement, confounding, effect modification, and strategies for minimizing bias in clinical and epidemiologic studies. Prerequisite: 225 or consent of instructor.
      Units: 3

    • HUMBIO 124E: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (MED 236)
      Introduction to global health topics such as childhood health, hygiene, drug resistance, and pharmaceutical industries from an economic development perspective. Introduces economic concepts including decision-making over time, externalities, and incentives as they relate to health. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
      Units: 3

    • HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health
      The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development and human rights. The course is intended for students interested in global health, development studies, or international relations, and provides opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or equivalent or consent of the instructor.
      Units: 3

    • MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health
      Preference to sophomores. History of human-rights law. International conventions and treaties on human rights as background for social and political changes that could improve the health of groups and individuals. Topics such as: regional conflict and health, the health status of refugees and internally displaced persons; child labor; trafficking in women and children; HIV/AIDS; torture; poverty, the environment and health; access to clean water; domestic violence and sexual assault; and international availability of drugs. Possible optional opportunities to observe at community sites where human rights and health are issues. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs including Doctors Without Borders; McMaster University Institute for Peace Studies; UC Berkeley Human Rights Center; Kiva. PowerPoint presentation on topic of choice required.
      Units: 3

    • MED 226: Practical Approaches to Global Health Research (HRP 237, INTLPOL 290)
      How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing.
      Units: 3

    • MS&E 185: Global Work
      Issues, challenges, and opportunities facing workers, teams, and organizations working across national boundaries. Topics include geographic distance, time zones, language and cultural differences, technologies to support distant collaboration, team dynamics, and corporate strategy. Limited enrollment.
      Units: 4

    • PEDS 124: Global Child Health (HUMBIO 124C, MED 124)
      This course introduces students to key challenges to the health and well being of children worldwide. We explicitly focus on child and public health problems in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to reflect the global burden of disease among children. We will review the scope and magnitude of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, as well as examine regional variations. We will then identify both medical and non-medical causes, effects of, as well as interventions to address, some of the biggest child health problems. The course will also prevent an overview of the role of culture, gender, and non-state actors (NGOs, foundations, etc.) on health and health policy.  Units: 3-5

    • PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health
      Open to medical students, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates. Examines the newly emerging field of human rights and global health, beginning with the essential background into the field of human rights, and the recent emergence of health as a human right. Emphasis is on the pioneering work of Dr. Paul Farmer and Partners in Health and the challenge he and his organization have posed to the conventional wisdom about approaches to combating poor health and disease worldwide. Topics include the "big three" infectious diseases -- tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS -- as well as emerging infectious diseases, clean water and sanitation, and malnutrition and famine.
      Units: 3

    • SURG 250: Politics, Culture, and Economics of Global Surgery (SURG 150)
      Focus is on understanding the growing role of surgery in international health, and to analyze the complex determinants of successful global surgery programs. Expert invited speakers highlight a variety of issues such as history, ethics, governance, and finances related to global surgery. Discussion and lab sessions cover basic clinical skills, needs finding, and creative problem solving. Students work in groups to complete a substantial final project on surgical program development. Option 1. Lecture only (1 unit). Option 2. Lecture series + discussions + workshops + team project 4 units. Must select Option 2 to count for Global Health Scholarly Concentration core course requirement.  Open to undergraduate, graduate and medical students.
      Units: 4
  • Alternatively, the GH core course requirement can be fulfilled by completing at least three of the following four core seminars:
    • BIOE 371: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (MED 271) (1 unit)
    • MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility (1 unit)
    • MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights (1 unit)
    • MED 285: Global Leaders and Innovators in Human and Planetary Health (1 unit)
  • GH students can complete the rest of their GH coursework with at least one elective course (to complete 6 total units in Global Health) in a GH-related area. There are many courses relevant to GH at Stanford. Discussion with your Foundation and Application directors is advised to best develop the coursework plan that fits your interests. Interdisciplinary courses related to Global Health, including some selected from business, economics, anthropology, engineering, and epidemiology are welcome; many examples are noted below:

Electives:

AFRICAST 212. AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, ESS 111)

CEE 265D: Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

CEE 277S: Design for a Sustainable World (CEE 177S)

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

CHPR 166: Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context (HUMBIO 166)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

EARTHSYS 106: World Food Economy (ECON 106, EESS 106)

EARTHSYS 144: Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS) (EESS 164)

EASTASN 217. Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia

ECON 118: Development Economics

ECON 127. Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries

EDUC 296: Introduction to Survey Research

GLOBAL 101: Critical Issues in Global Affairs

HRP 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (MED 224, PUBLPOL 224)

HRP 225. Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies

HRP 226: Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods

HRP 231: Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases

HRP 234: Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health (HUMBIO 154A, MED 254)

HRP 251: Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials

HRP 252: Outcomes Analysis (BIOMEDIN 251, MED 252)

HRP 258: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research

HRP 259: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology

HUMBIO 129S. Global Public Health

HUMBIO 153. Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges

HUMRTS 110: Global Women's Issues in Human Rights and Health

INTLPOL 281: Global Poverty and the Law

INTLPOL 302: The Global Economy

INTLPOL 355: International Human Rights (LAW 5010)

ME 177: Global Engineers' Education

MED 108Q: Human Rights and Health

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

MED 224: Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health (HRP 224, PUBLPOL 224)

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

MED 233: Global Health: Beyond Diseases and International Organizations

MED 235: Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems (AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26)

MED 236: Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health (HUMBIO 124E)

MED 242: Physicians and Human Rights

MED 256. Global HIV/AIDS

MED 262: Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries (ECON 127)

MED 271: Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context (BIOE 371)

MS&E 185: Global Work

OIT 333: Design for Extreme Affordability

OSPCPTWN 43: Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa

PEDS 202C: Qualitative Research Methods and Study Design (SURG 202C)

PEDS 212: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (HUMBIO 122M) 

PEDS 223: Human Rights and Global Health

PEDS 250: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (PEDS 150)

POLISCI 247G: Governance and Poverty

POLISCI 421K: Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives (COMM 339, PSYCH 231)

SOC 133D: Globalization and Social Change

SOC 147: Race and Ethnicity Around the World (CSRE 147A, SOC 247)

SURG 250: Politics, Culture, and Economics of Global Surgery (SURG 150)