General Surgery In the Department of Surgery

Rotations during Training at Stanford

The Core General Surgery Residency: Anyone contemplating interviewing at Stanford and becoming part of this training program will want to know something about the rotations during their five clinical years of training. We have chosen to divide the residency into two components; the Core General Surgery Residency and the Senior General Surgery Training Program. At Stanford, the six categorical General Surgery residents are joined by up to five preliminary residents who are entering fields such as Interventional Radiology, Anesthesiology, etc., as well as five first year Orthopedic residents, three first year Plastic Surgery residents, three Urology residents, four Otolaryngology/Head and Neck residents , four Neurosurgery residents, two Cardiothoracic residents, and one Vascular. Thus, in the first postgraduate year there are a total of 32 interns at Stanford. In the second year of training there are at least 12 residents and occasionally 13 or 14, consisting of the six categorical General Surgery residents, the three Plastic Surgery residents, three Urology residents, two Cardiothoracic residents, 1 Vascular, and occasionally one or two individuals seeking a second year of training before going into a different subspecialty. These residents are considered to be part of the Core General Surgery Residency. The assignments of residents are driven by a core curriculum and by the special requirements of the Residency Review Committee. A representative sample of rotations follows this brief narrative description. The goal of the Core General Surgery Residency is to provide residents with graduated responsibilities in the primary components of General Surgery. In addition, it will give them an appropriate experience in subspecialties required by the Residency Review Committee. It is extremely important to point out that during these first two years the residents do a large number of operations under the direct supervision of a faculty attending or in some cases, a senior surgical resident. Our interns and second year residents perform as many as 100-200 cases per year during this time.

PGY-I Rotations:

General Surgery (SCVMC)          

4 weeks

VA General Surgery            

4 weeks 

Surg Onc1     4 weeks

Surg Onc2

4 weeks

HPB 4 weeks

Thoracic Surgery                     

4 weeks

Transplant                         

4 weeks

Pediatric Surgery (LPCH)             

4 weeks

Vascular Surgery    

4 weeks

Orthopedic Surgery                     

4 weeks

ACS Days                      

4 weeks

ACS Nights                    

4 weeks

Colorectal                       

4 weeks

MIS 4 weeks

Breast

4 weeks

 

PGY-II Rotations:

General Surgery (Kaiser) 

12 weeks

General Surgery (SCVMC)             

8-12 weeks

SICU                             

8 weeks

Urology (Stanford)                         

4 weeks

Plastics & Burns Surgery (SCVMC)

4 weeks

Cardiac (VAMC)                             

4 weeks

ACS Nights 4 weeks

Urology (VAMC)                              

4 weeks

 

PGY-III Rotations:

General Surgery (Kaiser)             

2 months

Pediatric Surgery

1 month

Colorectal Surgery 1 month
Breast Surgery 1 month

SICU

2 months

Transplant Elective                  

1 month

Surg Onc Elective                  

1 month

International Elective

1 month

Thoracic Surgery Elective

1 month

Breast Surgery Elective

1 month

 

PGY-IV Rotations:

General Surgery (SCVMC)             

2 months

ACS (Night Float & Day) 

4 months

Kaiser     

2 months

VA General Surgery

2 months

MIS                           

2 months

 

PGY-V Rotations:

General Surgery (Kaiser)                 

2 months

General Surgery (SCVMC)               

2 months

Stanford Surc Onc 1&2  and HPB     

5 months

CPMC 1 month

Colorectal Surgery              

2 months

 

 

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