Current Issues in Genetics (CIG) 

Fridays, 4:00-5:00, Alway M-114 (unless announced otherwise)

 

July 24     Ben Siranosian (Bhatt Lab), Gabe Rosenfield (Postdoc, Pringle Lab) and Miranda Stratton, Ph.D. Assistant Director, Biosciences Diversity Programs

 

July 31     Nicholas Hughes (Cong and Winslow Labs), Kyomi Igarashi (Baker and Nakauchi Labs) and Olena Zhulyn (Postdoc, Barna Lab)

 

Aug. 8.     Robin Meyers (Khavari Lab), Ching Pin Cheng (Barna Lab) and Connor Horton (Research Associate, Fordyce Lab)

 

Aug. 14  Katelyn McKown (Bergmann Lab), Joseph Yracheta, MS, Pharmacogenomics and Kevin Van Bortle (Postdoc, Snyder Lab)

 

Aug. 21  Sedona Murphy (Boettiger Lab) and Graham Erwin (Postdoc, Snyder Lab)

 

Department Conversation following CIG July 24

The Department Conversations team, as part of the broader Genetics Advocacy work, is focused on fostering ongoing conversations about advocacy, justice, and anti-racism -related issues in the department. To kick off our efforts, in collaboration with John Pringle, we have invited Dr. Miranda Stratton and Dr. Latishya Steele (see below for full bios) from the Office of Graduate Education to speak at CIG  Friday, July 24th, after the science talks, session beginning at about 1:45 pm (zoom link). We hope you will join us for their presentation on Friday as well as a follow-up discussion our team will be leading on Tuesday, July 28th at 3 pm (zoom link).

Bios:

Dr. Miranda Stratton

Miranda Stratton, Ph.D. (she, her, hers) is the Assistant Director for Biosciences Diversity Programs in the Office of Graduate Education at Stanford School of Medicine. She directs the Stanford Summer Research Program (SSRP), a summer research program for visiting undergraduates from underrepresented or diverse backgrounds in STEM. She also engages in diversity recruitment efforts and outreach for the Biosciences PhD programs

Miranda received her Ph.D. in Biology from Stanford University in 2019. Under the guidance of Tim Stearns, her research focused on the characterizing centriole amplification in endocycling mouse trophoblast giant cells (TGCs), a naturally invasive cell type found in the developing placenta. She is passionate about building inclusive spaces cultivated on belonging. She earned her BA in biology and minored in chemistry at the University of San Diego in 2013, where she was a McNair Scholar. As a first-generation, Latina college student, Miranda credits USD McNair Scholars for equipping her with the skills necessary to be a successful scientist and advocate for diversifying STEM.

Dr. Latishya Steele

Latishya Steele, PhD (she, her, hers) is currently the Director, Biosciences Programs and Curriculum in the Office of Graduate Education at Stanford School of Medicine. She works to develop curricular and programmatic frameworks that integrate academic coursework, support for excellence in research, professional development for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty, grant and fellowship writing, and oral and written communication. Latishya loves to be “scientist-adjacent” and is excited about opportunities to develop, coach, and support scientists. Her current work also provides direct support to faculty via the development, implementation, assessment, and iteration of mentor training and via 1:1 and group-based support for faculty who are developing research training grant proposals. Guided by her desire to diversify STEM, Latishya is also energized by opportunities to connect with, inspire, and motivate those from underserved backgrounds who are interested in graduate education and/or careers in the sciences to pursue these areas.

Latishya received her BS in biology from Brandeis University and her PhD in genetics from the University of Chicago. Latishya spent her PhD years as a fruit fly researcher characterizing genetic interactions between the Drosophila retinoblastoma gene (RBF) and phenotypic modifiers of RBF phenotype identified via mutagenesis screening. Following the her PhD, Latishya completed a postdoc in teaching and education as a Curriculum Fellow at Harvard Medical School and served as a training program manager for the Continuing Umbrella of Research Experiences (CURE) program for students from underrepresented populations to cancer research via mentored research experiences and personal and professional enrichment activities. 

A transformative experience for Latishya that set her on the trajectory towards pursuing graduate education in the sciences (and, undoubtedly, one that led her to where she is today) was being selected as a McNair Scholar, without which she might not ever have learned about graduate school or had the requisite preparation to apply.