Gastroenterology Hepatology & Nutrition
in the department of Pediatrics

Education

Fellowship Program Director: John Alan Kerner, MD

John KernerDr. Kerner has been a faculty member in Pediatric Gastro-enterology since 1979 at Stanford University School of Medicine. He served as a director of the Division form 1979-1985 and as co-director from 1985 thorough 1994. He is board certified in Pediatric Gastroenterology and in Pediatrics. He was recently recertified in Pediatric Gastroenterology in 1997. Dr. Kerner has received three prestigious teaching awards: a. named by the Pediatric Housestaff as the Pediatric Faculty Member Who Contributed Most to Housestaff Teaching (6/81); b. Kaiser award for innovative

Fellowship

Description of fellowship program:

The goal of the subspecialty Residency (fellowship) is to train physician to achieve excellence in the practice of clinical pediatric gastroenterology, scholarly basic science and clinical research, and medical education. The goals of this program are achieved over the course of three years of training.

Briefly:
  1. GI residents accept graduated responsibility in the area of children with gastrointestinal, hepatic and nutritional disorders while under the direct supervision of a board certified pediatric gastroenterologist while rotating through the gastroenterology inpatient service, the liver transplant , and elective experiences in pediatrics radiology and pediatric pathology. This responsibility includes patent care, parent conferences, consultations with other subspecialties, night and weekend call, and interfacing with the many services which interact with pediatric gastroenterology, nutrition, and liver transplant.
  2. The first year of the residency will be primarily clinical in nature, during which the resident will become trained in the evaluation and management of children with diseases of the gastrointestinal system and their nutritional consequents. During the course of the first year, the resident will be introduced to the ongoing research programs of each contributing faculty members so that by the end of the year the resident will be introduced to the ongoing research programs of each contributing faculty members so that by primarily to investigation in the field of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, but the resident will continue to participate in the clinical activities of the Division to the appropriate degree to maintain and hone clinical skills. After completion of the subspecialty residency, the GI resident will have met the requirements for board eligibility in Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition set forth by the America Board of Pediatrics .
  3. With the successful funding of the combined Stanford-UCSF HIH HIDDK Training Grant, the GI residents were exposed to diverse research possibilities, both basic science and clinical in focus, at both the Stanford and UCSF campuses. Even though the grant is no longer active, GI fellows still may utilize mentors at UCSF. Submission of research for presentation at meetings is actively supported, and application for grogram as a requirement for board certification.
  4. To encourage the development of teaching skills, resident participation is required at the weekly pediatric GI Journal Club/case discussion meeting. In addition , the resident presents 1-2 times /year at the combined adult GI/Pediatric GI Journal Club –also a weekly event. The GI resident also will present 1 of the 4 “board review Lectures: in Gastroenterology at the Noon lecture Series designed for pediatric house staff and students.
The program permits achievement of the above goals by providing:

Duration of the Program

Our program is of three years duration for the following reasons:

John Kerner, M.D. is currently the Fellowship Program Director at Stanford University School of Medicine.

The first year of the GI subspecialty residency will be primarily clinical in nature, during which the GI resident will become trained in the evaluation and management of children with diseases of the gastrointestinal system and their nutritional consequences.

During the course of the first year, the trainee will be introduced to the ongoing research programs of each contributing faculty member so that by the end of the year, the GI resident will be able to select a research area to pursue. The second and third years will be devoted primarily to investigation in the field of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, but the GI resident will continue to participate in the clinical activities of the Division to the appropriate degree to maintain and hone clinical skills.

The program is a three-year Fellowship that emphasizes the development of experience and proficiency in clinical, investigative, and educational aspects of gastroenterology and hepatology. The structure of the program will be flexible so that trainees may equip themselves for a career as either clinical or investigative gastroenterologists.

In general, the first year emphasizes the acquisition of basic skills in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. The second and third years involve a continued role in patient care, with the balance of available time individualized toward the pursuit of specific research interests, either clinical or basic science oriented. Advanced endoscopic procedures will be stressed only after the first year. Medical-Surgical, Pathological, Radiology, Problem Case Management, G.I. Journal Club, and Research conferences are also held, primarily for the education of Fellows. At the present time, our gastroenterology and hepatology program will have a total of five funded clinical fellowships (not per annum).

Training is conducted among the various teaching hospitals, including Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center and Enlo Hospital.

Joint conferences, including a weekly division-wide GI clinical conference and a GI journal club, are regularly scheduled.

 

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