Faculty Profiles in Excellence

Stanford Medicine faculty are at the cutting edge of patient care, research, and education.
Who are these amazing individuals and what do they do at Stanford?

At Stanford, everybody you meet has something special to contribute. The spirit of innovation. The spirit of collaboration. The support. The infrastructure. You can go to any meeting and find a new collaborator.

Waldo Concepcion

Surgery and Pediatrics – Nephrology

I am a professor of surgery, the chief of clinical transplantation, and the chief of pediatric kidney transplantation at Stanford. In addition, I participate actively in the management and treatment of kids with liver tumors, and I am involved in the management of dialysis for children. 

I’m also involved in adult liver transplantation. 

At Stanford, everybody you meet has something special to contribute. The spirit of innovation. The spirit of collaboration. The support. The infrastructure. You can go to any meeting and find a new collaborator. Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital and Stanford are fertile ground for collaboration and innovation. Everything is limitless.

My research interests include looking at outcomes for pediatric kidney transplants. Kidney function is important for the development of children, so we are interested in studying how we can keep kidney transplants working in the long-term. My other area of interest involves complications after transplant, mainly viral infections. I work with an interdisciplinary team on T-cell-derived therapy. The idea is that if children have a viral infection, we can try to optimize T-cell function to treat the infection.

I am also part of an international cohort of scientists working on creating an artificial liver for patients with acute liver injury. This is a multinational study, and the goal is to be able to help adults and children that suffer from acute liver injury here at Stanford. 

Another important project is a study regarding autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. This is a complex genetic disorder that affects the kidneys and liver. 

I believe that every day you need to approach life as if you have the opportunity to make a difference. Through collaboration, we can make a difference in this world. We are the largest pediatric transplant center in the country, for example, so we should be able to develop new guidelines and shed light on the world of pediatric transplantation.