Celebrating 35 Years of Service

M. Bethany Ball

Department: 
Pediatrics

Bethany Ball has worked at Stanford since shortly after graduating from University of Oregon with a degree in molecular biology. She originally worked in the laboratory of Herb Schwartz doing research on pediatric hematology. She transitioned to work with Dr. David Stevenson in the Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, initially doing laboratory based investigation, but then became involved in clinical research studies being performed in the Pediatric General Clinical Research Center (GCRC). One of the first studies she worked on was on surfactant for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, a landmark intervention for premature infants. David Stevenson successfully competed for the NICHD Neonatal Research Network grant in 1991, and Bethany has been the research coordinator for this grant for 24 years. Her exceptional dedication, commitment, and broad-based expertise have been critical to the success of the grant. Bethany’s deep understanding of clinical and translational research structure and processes led to her appointment as Divisional Research Director with oversight and coordination responsibilities for clinical research, interfacing with other Johnson Center stakeholders and with pediatric medical and surgical subspecialties through Stanford Children’s Health. Bethany has had a central role in clinical trials that have changed the practice of neonatology, including inhaled nitric oxide for hypoxic respiratory failure and whole body cooling for neonatal asphyxia. Follow-up of newborns is important in understanding the long-term effects of our therapies. Through Bethany’s efforts as the follow-up coordinator, the Stanford site has one of the highest follow-up rates. Bethany does what it takes to get the job done, whether it’s learning how to cool newborn infants to 92F, traveling to 18 cities to teach other research coordinators how to perform aEEG, or doing neurodevelopmental follow-up in remote locations of Mexico. It’s hard to imagine how we could manage without her. In summary, we want to recognize Bethany for her sustained and exemplary efforts to perform research that has changed the practice of neonatology and affects the lives of thousands of newborns each year. 

Catharine Booth

Department: 
Molecular and Cellular Physiology

Cathy Booth started in 1979 as a research assistant in David Clayton's lab where she spent most of two years sequencing mouse mitochondrial DNA--something that today would take only minutes. The view from the Clayton lab in the Lane building was the newly finished Fairchild building. After five years, in 1984, Cathy transferred to the Genetics Department into a newly minted role as the "Lab Coordinator"-- she was the second department lab manager in the School of Medicine. She came to Molecular and Cellular Physiology in 1992 when the department was only 3 years old. Cathy has always enjoyed the odd challenge as well as the routine of ensuring a safe, cost effective and trouble-free lab environment for our faculty and research staff. As the dreaded Y2K date approached, Cathy's then DFA Shayne Frankel noted: "Because of Cathy's stellar efforts, MCP is extremely well-positioned to deal with whatever might happen at midnight, December 31,1999." Lucky for Cathy, she got a good night's sleep. Cathy earned The SOM Spirit Award in 2001--the first year it was awarded--for her service-orientation, positive attitude, and innovative and resourceful problem solving, which included improving the maintenance of the Beckman glasswash facilities to working on University-wide task forces on issues such as CAMS, chemical inventory and space inventory. Today Cathy is still valued for her good judgement, exceptional work ethic, creativity and commitment to bench research. She has told me: "I love working at and for Stanford and feel lucky to have spent my entire adult career in such a beautiful and supportive work environment," and all of us at Stanford are equally lucky that Cathy has chosen to work with us. Congratulations on 35 years, Cathy, and thank you. --Elisabeth Einaudi, MCP DFA

Frederick S. Brickman

Department: 
Pediatrics

Fred has been part of the administrative team in the Division of Neonatology for the past 18 years.

He is a conscientious and diligent member of the team and is always willing to help without reservations. In the recent past, he has been assisting the finance team with maintaining files and distribution of mail and supplies.

It is an absolute pleasure working with Fred.

 - Jessica Campbell Olson

Michelle K. Ferrari

Department: 
Urology

Michelle Ferrari currently serves as a Research Nurse in the Department of Urology at Stanford University Medical Center.  Thirty-five years ago, Michelle began work at Stanford as a Staff Nurse on West 3B caring for Urology and ENT surgical patients.  In 1984, she took the opportunity to work full time as a research nurse in charge of a study of a new therapy for bladder cancer.  Soon she was responsible for several studies at Stanford and several other institutions for the Northern California Oncology Group.  As research shifted in the Department of Urology, Michelle began work on several prostate cancer focused projects.  She went on to develop a detailed clinical database of over 3000 patients treated surgically for localized prostate cancer that has been the source of many seminal publications in the field.  She continues as manager of these large databases and has been primarily responsible for prospective trials in active surveillance for prostate cancer, chemotherapy for high risk localized prostate cancer, and development of prognostic markers for prostate cancer.

Michelle’s interests and efforts have extended beyond oncology in the Department of Urology.  She has become an expert in HIPAA rules and compliance and in clinical trial development and regulatory issues.  She has been primarily responsible for numerous IRB submissions and maintenance of approvals.  She has been the research coordinator of over 35 clinical trials and research studies from inception to close out.  She is regarded as the departmental resource person for clinical trials and clinical database development.  Michelle has also managed clinical trials in all of the major disciplines in urology including pediatric urology, incontinence, and erectile dysfunction.  She is an author of 24 scientific publications and contributed to innumerable other studies.  She has also presented her work at national meetings and freely given her time to educate residents and staff.  For her hard work and dedication, she was awarded the Stanford University School of Medicine Spirit Award, 2002.

Julian Hinojoza

Department: 
Pathology

Julian Hinojoza, a veteran of the U.S. Army (1972-74), worked at Veterinary Reference and Veterinary Disease Laboratories in San Jose and started his career as a Life Sciences Research Assistant at Stanford in 1981 in what was then the Division of Laboratory Medicine (DLAM). He worked on bacterial pathogenesis and acquired skills in electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immuno-EM, biochemistry and molecular biology. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Microbiology, Clinical Laboratory Sciences from San Jose State University in 1990. His previous supervisors praised his patience, dexterity, organizational skills, independence and meticulous attention to detail, i.e. traits that continue to characterize his entire career.

Julian joined my lab in the Department of Pathology at the Palo Alto VA in 1994. Since then, he has continuously displayed these traits and acquired many additional skills, always with extraordinarily high standards and productivity. I am extremely grateful for all of his excellent work, including lab management, for the past 20 years and for being able to deal with the challenges of performing laboratory research at the VA. In particular, his determination, innovation and fortitude in pursuing a very difficult project on antibody cross-reactivity is now (after many years of frustration) coming to fruition.

Our colleague, Dr. May Han adds that, “Julian is a great protein biochemist and experimentalist, amazing Dad (of 3 now adult sons), creator of amazing moles and tamales, a naturalist photographer who knows Yosemite inside out, and the kindest and most helpful colleague.”

Thank you, Julian, for your 35 years of service to Stanford and for your many continuing contributions!

- Raymond Sobel, MD (Supervisor)

Gina C. Jager

Department: 
Microbiology and Immununology

Gina first started in the Herzenberg lab at Stanford University, where she supported the early stages of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) research. She was essential to many research projects where she generated, purified, and conjugated antibodies that are still used today. Her tissue culture skills are so impressive that she is now considered the “Tissue Culture Guru” and has been specifically requested for assistance in a large Ovarian Cancer research project to maintain control cell lines. She became Dr. Garry Nolan’s technician while he was a graduate student in the Herzenberg lab, and he was so impressed by her technical skills that he offered her a position once he established his own lab. Her contributions to research in the laboratory have been acknowledged in co-authorship on 11 publications,and she has utilized the many years of FACS and tissue culture experience to assist in countless research projects. She not only supports the Nolan lab by managing the ordering system and animal protocols, but she is the Facilities/Laboratory Services Manager for the entire Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology, managing the space inventory, health and safety training, and the asset and capital equipment inventory. She is extremely hard working, reliable and always gets the job done. Her vast range of skills, from science to administration, has been invaluable to the Baxter Laboratory.

Jean L. Jang

Department: 
Pathology

Jean Jang has been instrumental in the success of the Butcher laboratory since shortly after its inception, and during her tenure with us she has impacted the lives of innumerable students and postdocs who have trained with us.  She has assumed many roles over the years, the most important of which has been maintaining our active tissue culture facility where she runs a tight ship. It seems she has somehow managed to anticipate most problems, but also deals efficiently with the many unavoidable issues of equipment and personnel when they do arise. She has been responsible for training students in tissue culture, and for helping them produce antibodies to chemoattractant, adhesion and other receptors. The facility has run so smoothly through so much of her tenure that most lab members mistakenly assume this is "routine," but the lack of microbial contamination (and of personal conflicts) in the tissue culture lab owe much to her constant oversight and calm but firm hand. In addition to her contributions within our group, Jean has been a positive force in the VA and wider research communities: among other contributions, she organized the hiring of a dedicated IT technologist for the VA, and she has produced and provided monoclonal antibodies and cell lines to 10’s if not 100 or more collaborating and other laboratories around the world. It is a pleasure to honor her contributions on the occasion of her 35th anniversary at Stanford!

- Dr. Eugen Butcher

Susan M. Johnson

Department: 
Medicine

Susan Johnson is the consummate professional. She has served as Division Manager in Nephrology for many years – at least several before I joined the faculty in 2007. In her role as Division Manager, she is partly responsible for virtually every activity performed by our faculty, staff and trainees, ranging from coordinating grant submissions, faculty and trainee recruitments, financial management and personnel/human resources management.  Indeed, before any of us engage persons outside of the Division on any professional matter, we approach Ms. Johnson for guidance and advice.  Personally, Ms. Johnson is my confidante. She has a keen understanding of the strengths and challenges faced by everyone employed in the Division.

I cannot imagine a more qualified or dedicated professional than Susan Johnson. I have often said that she is my “Co-Division Chief” – but she is much more than that, to me and to everyone in the Division of Nephrology. It is my honor to work alongside her.

- Glenn Chertow

Jeannie Lukas

Department: 
Structural Biology

Jeannie has been a member of the Department of Structural Biology for her entire 35-year career at Stanford University. She has made many contributions over the years and is much appreciated by the faculty she has served.

Jeannie Lukas has been my Administrative Associate for 35 years, and has at the same time served James Spudich (now in Biochemistry), Michael Levitt, and several other faculty members in the Department of Structural Biology.  Jeannie is quite simply the best Administrative Associate I have encountered or have known of. She has handled many complex matters for me over the years, and incredibly, she has never made a mistake of any kind!! On the contrary, she is always ahead in her work, anticipating my needs and those of others, and dealing with matters before they even come to our attention. Jeannie is moreover wise, thoughtful, and invariably good humored. I really could not have done my work without her. Through the years Jeannie has never lost a step. She continues to deal with all matters with skill and alacrity. She deserves all the appreciation and support that the institution can bestow.

-Roger Kornberg
Professor, Structural Biology

Carmencita E. Nicolas

Department: 
Pediatrics

When Cita joined Stanford, she was initially employed in Radiobiology Research working as a Lab Assistant, and later in the HRP Department as a Life Science Technician. She transferred to the Department of Pathology in 1989 and made history as the initial full-time employee of the newly formed Molecular Diagnosis Lab, the first of its kind to be established. In this capacity, she performed highly specialized and technically demanding molecular procedures to assist in the diagnosis of patients with blood cell disorders. Due in large part to Cita’s efforts, the laboratory evolved into a full-fledged clinical service and was subsequently relocated into the hospital’s clinical laboratories in 1996. Wishing to maintain a link with the experimental side of the department, Cita transferred to the Cleary Lab as a research assistant. Throughout the ensuing years, Cita has functioned as the lab manager responsible for maintaining everyday operations of the research laboratory.  In addition to performing her own experiments, Cita introduces each new lab member and trainee to the laboratory’s routines and protocols. She is a rock of stability maintaining order and consistency in the group, and compliance with the ever-increasing regulatory requirements. Cita quietly engenders a friendly, interactive and collaborative work environment, including remembrance and celebration of special occasions. Her personal touch has defined the spirit of the Cleary Lab and played a major role in its scientific success.

Linda Lew Yasukawa

Department: 
Medicine

We are very lucky to have Linda in Greenberg lab. She is such a wonderful co-worker. Her work ethic is exemplary. Since she joined our lab we have become much better organized. Our lab supply is well-stocked, and our common lab spaces and equipment are well taken care of. She is also a very detail-oriented person. She performs experiments with such carefulness and precision that we trust her results the best. She is not only a good scientist but also a kind, caring, and truthful human being. Everyone in our lab loves her. We share our jokes, as well as our problems. We very much appreciate her devotion and contribution to the scientific research and to all of us in our lab and the Stanford community.