Current Lab Members

Jun Ding, PhD, Principal Investigator

Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and Neurological Sciences

Bio  

Jun Ding, PhD, is a scientist in the field of striatal neurobiology and basal ganglia research. His work employs a unque combination of novel microscopy techniques, electrophysiology and genetic tools.  He performed his PhD dissertation research with Dr. D. James Surmeier at Northwestern University.  For his postdoctoral training, he joined the laboratory of Dr. Bernardo Sabatini at Harvard Medical School. As an independent researcher, he investigates the functional organization of cortico-thalamobasal ganglia circuits.

Email: dingjun@stanford.edu


Richard Roth, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

Richard received his PhD in Neuroscience from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where he used in vivo imaging approaches to study synaptic plasticity during motor learning. As a postdoc in the Ding lab, Richard is focused on understanding how different brain circuits involved in motor control interact with each other to generate skilled motor movements. Originally from Germany, Richard enjoys traveling and skiing in his spare time.

Email: rhroth@stanford.edu


Daniel Bloodgood, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

I received my PhD in Neuroscience from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2019. My research in graduate school focused on the contribution of anxiety to promoting excessive alcohol in drinking. In the Ding Lab, I am examining how models of alcohol abuse lead to long-lasting changes in synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Outside the lab, I enjoy running, cycling, and hiking around the many nature trails in the Bay Area.

Email: dbloodgood@stanford.edu


Mengjun Sheng, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

Mengjun obtained his PhD from the Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences. His thesis work was focused on the neuronal activity changes in striatum during motor learning. Currently in Ding lab he is interested in the role of cortical basal ganglia circuits in motor learning. Outside the lab he likes running and bodybuilding.

Email: mjsheng@stanford.edu


Di Lu, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

I obtained my PhD from the Institute of Neuroscience, Chinese Academy of Sciences. My thesis work dissected the role of D1R and D2R neurons in the dorsolateral striatum during mouse motor learning. Currently I am interested in the function of cortico - basal ganglia circuits during motor learning. Outside the lab I like traveling and reading.

Email: ludi89@stanford.edu


Omar Jaidar, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

2016- to date - Postdoctoral Researcher - Neurosurgery/Prof. Jun B. Ding/Stanford University Medical Center, U.S.A.

2012- 2016 - Postdoctoral Researcher - Brain Mechanism for Behavior Unit/Prof. Gordon Arbuthnott/Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Japan

2008-2011 - Ph.D./Summa Cum Laude - National University of Mexico (U.N.A.M.) Mexico

Email: ojaidar@stanford.edu


Dongli Xu, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

The mysteries of the brain fascinated me. Currently I focus on the development of new imaging tools for mammalian brain, which is crucial to understand the function of neural circuit. I received my PhD from Huazhong University of science and technology, and have a background in engineering and optics.

Email: donglixu@stanford.edu


Yue Sun, PhD

Post-doctoral Fellow

Bio  

Yue Sun was born in Hangzhou, China. She earned her Ph.D. in 2017 at Fudan University. Her main thesis work was to study RNA splicing  and its contribution to complex diseases when mis-regulated. In Stanford University, as a joint postdoctoral researcher in Jun Ding lab and Sui Wang lab  (Ophthalmology Department), she focuses on two directions. One direction is to develope AAV tools for labeling gene expression profile or circuit-specific neurons in retina and brain. The other direction is to use activity-dependent labeling system to dissect neuronal subpopulations underlying different aspects of motor learning and use RNA-seq to identify genes critical for these processes.

Email: sunyue@stanford.edu


Renzhi Yang

Graduate Student

Bio

I went to the Chinese University of Hong Kong for undergraduate study. I was working on the molecular mechanisms of protein trafficking in Arabidopsis. I joined the Ding lab in 2015. I am studying the regulatory roles of striatal interneurons during motor learning and behavior, using electrophysiology recording, optogenetics and pharmacology. Outside lab, I am the best dad in the world to my dog, Jamie.

Email: renzhiy@stanford.edu


Eddy Albarran

Graduate Student

Bio

B.S., Stanford University, Symbolic Systems - Neurosciences (honors, Biology minor). Currently a graduate student in the Neurosciences program (co-advised by Carla Shatz), Eddy's research focus concerns exploring novel mechanisms underlying experience-dependent plasticity of motor circuits. Specifically, Eddy utilizes in vivo microscopy and acute slice physiology to investigate neuron-astrocyte interactions and mechanisms of endocannabinoid plasticity in the murine striatum. Outside the lab, Eddy enjoys hiking, video games, and Costco pizza.

Email: albarran@stanford.edu


Konstantin Kaganovsky

Graduate Student

Bio

After graduating from UC Santa Barbara, I did research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Baltimore, Maryland. When I am not patching cells or running behavior, I enjoy meditating, surfing, and making mustard.

Email: kkaganov@stanford.edu


Stephen Evans

Graduate Student

Bio

Stephen obtained his bachelor's degree at The University of Texas at San Antonio in Biology, with minors in Math and Chemistry. He first became interested in motor learning when studying birdsong in bengalese finches. He is now interested in studying similar questions of motor learning in the mouse system, and is also developing genetically engineered voltage indicators to use in his work in the lab of Dr. Michael Lin.

Email: swevans@stanford.edu


Yu Lui, PhD

Technician

Bio

Yu obtained her PhD from Shanghai Institute of Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Prior to joining Stanford she also worked as a Research Associate at Penn State University and Johns Hopkins University.

Email: yul2@stanford.edu


Alumni

Yu-Wei Wu, PhD

Former - Post-doctoral Fellow

Current Affiliation - Principle Investigator at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan

Website: https://wulabimb.squarespace.com/

 

Jae-Ick Kim, PhD

Former - Post-doctoral Fellow

Current Affiliation - Assistant Professor at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea

Rupa Lalchandani, PhD

Former - Post-doctoral Fellow, Stanford Neurosciences Institute Interdisciplinary Scholar

Current Affiliation - Assistant Professor at Notre Dame de Namur University, California, USA

Kai Du, PhD

Former - Visiting Graduate Student

Current Affiliation - Postdoc at Karolinska Institute, Sweden