2019-2020 Cardiovascular Medicine Fellows

The mission is to train leaders in academic cardiology for the 21st century. In accord with this mission, the cardiovascular medicine training program at Stanford University has been developed to offer a wide range of opportunities leading to a career in academic cardiology. Emphasis is placed on selection of applicants with strong clinical and research backgrounds. Below you will find a list of our current Fellows at Stanford School of Medicine. 

Chief Fellows

  • Clarke, Lee (Shoa)
    Dr. Clarke grew up in Portland, Maine and attended college at Cornell University. He completed his MD and PhD at Stanford School of Medicine, where he studied computational and evolutionary genomics. He then went on to complete internal medicine and pediatrics residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. He plans to become a basic scientist with a research focus on cardiovascular risk genetics and clinical focus on preventive cardiology. His goal is to identify both adults and children who have high genetic risk for cardiovascular disease in order to provide early treatment with a family centered approach.

  • Rogers, Albert (AJ)
    Dr. A.J. Rogers is a Cardiovascular Medicine Clinical and Research Fellow at Stanford University. He began working with medical technology as an undergraduate in biomedical engineering at Duke University and earned his medical degree and MBA from the University of North Carolina. His experience includes bench engineering science, clinical research, and medical device development and entrepreneurship. He completed Internal Medicine residency and clinical Cardiology training at Stanford University and joined Dr. Sanjiv Narayan’s laboratory investigating the mechanisms of cardiac fibrillation. He plans to pursue further training in clinical electrophysiology and launch a career as a physician-scientist in clinical electrophysiology.

First Year Fellows

  • Bell, Caitlin
    Dr. Bell was born and raised in Denver, Colorado and attended college at the University of Colorado - Boulder where she had the opportunity to work with Dr. Tom Cech investigating telomerase biochemistry.  She completed her MD at Vanderbilt University Medical School, during which she spent a year as a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator research fellow researching melanomagenesis through the lens of genetics and stem cell biology.  She then trained in internal medicine at Stanford University Hospital before continuing her clinical training in cardiology.  She plans to pursue a career as a physician-scientist, leveraging her prior research experiences to investigate the process of atherogenesis and determinants of smooth muscle cell fates leading to clinically significant vascular disease.
  • Elezaby, Aly
    Dr Elezaby attended college at the University of Arizona, where he studied molecular and cellular biology. He graduated from the MD-PhD program at Boston University, with a dissertation focus on the effects of diet on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in the heart. He completed residency training in internal medicine at Stanford as part of the Translational Investigator Program, and intends to pursue a career studying cardiac metabolism with a clinical focus on heart failure.
  • Ning, Ning "Maggie"
    Dr. Ning was born in China, but she grew up mostly in Texas. She went to the University of Texas at Austin for undergrad and received her PharmD degree at the College of Pharmacy. She received her MD degree from UT Southwestern Medical Center and moved to California for Internal Medicine residency at Stanford. Dr. Ning plans to continue her training as a cardiology fellow at Stanford. She is passionate about both cardiology and oncology and thoroughly enjoys taking care of these patient populations. Subsequently, she has completed several research projects and publications in both fields. She hopes to combine her clinical and research interests by contributing to the growth of the field of cardio-oncology. She hopes she can also use her pharmacology background to better understand the complex pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics involving oncology therapies and cardiotoxicity. She is particularly interested in the role of noninvasive imaging to help identify these patients that may be at risk for cardiotoxicity. 
  • Sanchez, Pablo
    Dr. Sanchez grew up in Barquisimeto, Venezuela. He attended college and medical school at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He did Internal Medicine training at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, research under the tutelage of the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) group, and was Chief Resident from 2018-2019. He is broadly interested in Cardiology Critical Care and mechanical circulatory support. His research centers around clinical outcomes of the complex patient composition in the modern Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit. He is now a fellow at Stanford and plans to pursue a career in Critical Care and Cardiovascular academic medicine. 
  • Tooley III, James
    Dr. James Tooley was born and raised in Tucson, Arizona. He attended Johns Hopkins University where he graduated with honors with a degree in Biophyiscs. He received his MD and MHS from Yale School of Medicine, where he graduated cum laude and was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute research fellow. He completed his Internal Medicine residency training at Stanford. He is interested electrophysiology, ECGs, and research using the electronic healthcare record. James plans to have an academic career as a clinical investigator practicing electrophysiology. 
  • Weldy, Chad
    Dr. Weldy received his MD from Duke University and came to Stanford as an internal medicine resident and member of the Stanford Translational Investigator Program (TIP). Prior to medical school, Dr. Weldy completed his PhD in Toxicology at the University of Washington (UW) where his research focused on genetic determinants of antioxidant biosynthesis, redox biology, and vascular function in response to inhaled toxicants. Dr. Weldy then completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the UW Division of Cardiology where he studied the relationship between cardiac development and adult heart failure. His work led to the discovery that in utero exposure to air pollution increases adult susceptibility to heart failure in mice. As a resident at Stanford, he has conducted research investigating how global profiles of circulating miRNA can predict RV failure in adult patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Dr. Weldy plans a career as an academic clinical cardiologist and basic scientist with the goal of elucidating novel mechanisms of disease by characterizing the relationship between the developing heart and adult cardiovascular disease.  

Second Year Fellows

  • Beach, Leila
    Dr. Leila Yeh Beach studied chemistry as an undergraduate at Stanford before going on to earn her MD from the UCSF School of Medicine. During this period, she spent a year in Beijing investigating the heparin contamination incident alongside teams from the FDA and Peking University. She subsequently completed her internal medicine residency at UCSF where she conducted research regarding cardiovascular health outcomes disparities along race and ethnic lines. She is now back at Stanford for her cardiology fellowship and hopes to apply her research interest in racial and ethnic disparities to her clinical interest in heart failure and transplant. 
  • Chang, Andrew
    Dr. Chang was born in Columbus, but grew up in Phoenix, Honolulu, and Las Vegas. He went to college at Yale University, then received his MD from Stanford. He completed his residency training in the global health track of Stanford's internal medicine program in 2016 and served as chief resident in 2017. He earned an MS in Epidemiology from Stanford as well. He is interested in studying cardiovascular disease in global vulnerable populations, and is currently conducting mixed methods research, epidemiological profiling, and cost-effectiveness analyses of rheumatic heart disease in East Africa. He intends to pursue a career in global health research with a clinical focus on echocardiography. 
  • Kalwani, Neil
    Dr. Kalwani grew up in Indiana and attended college at Yale University.  He then completed an MD and MPP at Harvard University and trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where he completed the Management Leadership Track.  He plans to become an academic cardiologist, focusing on health services research and health care management.  His goal is to identify and implement policies and delivery models that improve the value of care provided to patients with cardiovascular disease.
  • Sarraju, Ashish
    Dr. Sarraju grew up in India and attended college at Boston University, where he studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He spent a year after college at the Massachusetts General Hospital, working on targeted iron-based nanoparticle delivery. He attended medical school at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He went on to complete internal medicine residency at Stanford and served as a Chief Resident in 2017-2018. He plans to continue a career in academic cardiology with a clinical and research focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and lipidology. 
  • Wayda, Brian
    Dr. Brian Wayda received his MD at Yale University and completed internal medicine residency training at Columbia University Medical Center. Now a cardiology fellow at Stanford, he plans to pursue an academic career in advanced heart failure and transplant. He has conducted research investigating racial and socioeconomic disparities in outcomes after heart transplant and myocardial infarction, and is now engaged in research on the comparative effectiveness and safety of immunosuppression regimens after transplant. Prior to his medical training, he obtained bachelor’s degrees in Physics and Economics and an MPH at Yale, and spent two years with the Clinton Foundation in Mozambique and South Africa.
  • Woo, Jennifer
    Dr. Woo grew up in Los Angeles, California and attended college at Brown University. She completed her MD and internal medicine and pediatrics residency at UCLA. There she developed a primary care clinical decision support tool and a heart failure app, "My Big Heart," which allows providers and patients to track their symptoms, medications and activity. She was the recipient of the Barbara Streisand research award for her work on implementing a preventive cardiology teen text-messaging program. She chose Stanford for cardiology fellowship for its strong program, quality teaching and excellent mentors. She plans to focus on cardiac imaging and adult-congenital cardiology. She is interested in computational assessments of diagnostic tools, data mining, and modeling algorithms. 

Research Fellows

  • Clarke, Lee (Shoa)
    Dr. Clarke grew up in Portland, Maine and attended college at Cornell University. He completed his MD and PhD at Stanford School of Medicine, where he studied computational and evolutionary genomics. He then went on to complete internal medicine and pediatrics residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. He plans to become a basic scientist with a research focus on cardiovascular risk genetics and clinical focus on preventive cardiology. His goal is to identify both adults and children who have high genetic risk for cardiovascular disease in order to provide early treatment with a family centered approach.
  • Gerber, Daniel
    Dr. Gerber was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland where he graduated from the University of Maryland with a Bachelor of Science in Neurobiology & Physiology. He earned his medical degree at the George Washington University School of Medicine in Washington, DC before traveling west to Stanford for internal medicine residency and cardiology fellowship training. During fellowship, he created Stanford's institutional database of cardiac ICU and percutaneous mechanical circulatory support patients and joined the nationwide Critical Care Cardiology Trial Network registry in order to more rigorously investigate this critically ill patient population. After cardiology fellowship, Dr. Gerber plans to obtain additional sub-specialization in critical care to prepare for an academic career with a clinical and research focus in optimizing the delivery of cardiac intensive care
  • Ouyang, David
    Dr. David Ouyang is a native of Houston, Texas and graduated from Rice University with a degree in Statistics and Biochemistry. He went to medical school at UCSF, where he was in the Clinical and Translational Research Pathway. He was at Stanford for Internal Medicine residency, where he focused on research with the electronic medical record system. David is interesting interested in a career in academic cardiology and is interested in applying Data Science and Deep Learning to Echocardiography.
  • Parizo, Justin
    Dr. Parizo was born in Southern California and attended UCLA for undergrad where he majored in physiology and developed a strong interest in global health. He travelled north to UCSF for medical school where he researched malaria molecular epidemiology. Between his third and fourth years he further pursued this interest through a Fulbright Fellowship in India during which he investigated an urban malaria outbreak in Ahmedabad, India. For residency he moved down the Peninsula to Stanford where his exposure to cardiology convinced him change his focus. At Stanford he has found his path in heart failure, MCS and transplant. He plans to pursue a career in this area with a research focus on outcomes and disparities in advanced heart failure and advanced therapies.
  • Zhu, Han
    Dr. Zhu grew up in Michigan, in a suburb of Detroit called Canton. She then went on to receive her Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). There, she fell in love with cardiovascular biology working in the lab of Dr. Elazer Edelman (MD/PhD). She went to medical school at Case Western Reserve University and worked in the lab of Dr. Mukesh Jain (MD) and Dr. Saptarsi Haldar (MD) on cardiomyocyte exercise biology and metabolism. She then did a Sarnoff Cardiovascular Fellowship in the lab of Dr. Anthony Rosenzweig (MD) at HMS working on  the role of microRNA in cardiomyocyte physiologic hypertrophy and exercise. She did her internal medicine residency at Stanford and is now in her second year of cardiology fellowship at Stanford. Long-term, she is interested in studying the role of inflammation in cardiomyocyte pathology. She also has an interest in cardio-oncology and the role of cancer therapeutics on cardiovascular toxicity.

Non-ACGME Fellows

  • Cheng, Paul
    Dr. Paul Cheng received his BEng in Chemical Engineering and BSc in biology at MIT, where he worked in the Wittrup lab  engineering antibody mimetic. He subsequently completed his MD/PhD at UCSF working in the Srivastava lab studying how a variety of morphogenic signals, including extracellular matrix, miRNA, and Wnt/Notch signaling affect the development and fate determination of cardiac progenitors. After finishing an internal medicine residency at Stanford, Paul has continued at Stanford as a fellow in cardiology. He is currently investigating molecular mechanisms underlying genetic risk factors for human cardiovascular disease with particular interest in coronary artery disease and cardiac amyloidosis.
  • Rogers, Albert (AJ)
    Dr. A.J. Rogers is a Cardiovascular Medicine Clinical and Research Fellow at Stanford University. He began working with medical technology as an undergraduate in biomedical engineering at Duke University and earned his medical degree and MBA from the University of North Carolina. His experience includes bench engineering science, clinical research, and medical device development and entrepreneurship. He completed Internal Medicine residency and clinical Cardiology training at Stanford University and joined Dr. Sanjiv Narayan’s laboratory investigating the mechanisms of cardiac fibrillation. He plans to pursue further training in clinical electrophysiology and launch a career as a physician-scientist in clinical electrophysiology.
  • Mamic, Petra
    Dr. Petra Mamic began her medical education in Croatia at the University of Zagreb. She then moved to the U.S. to get a degree in Molecular Biology at Loyola University Chicago, before going to Harvard Medical School to obtain her MD. After completing her internal medicine training at Stanford, she stayed on as a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow. Her research focuses on the role of the gut microbiome in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis, development of complications, response to therapy, and long-term outcomes. Supported by the NIH F32 funding, she is currently studying the role of the gut microbiome-host metabolome interactions in development of insulin resistance in chronic heart failure. Dr. Mamic’s goal is to specialize in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology, while continuing to build a microbiome-centered cardiovascular research program. 

Adult Congenital Heart Disease

  • Schultz, Karen
  • Vaikunth, Sumeet
    Dr. Vaikunth grew up in Nashville, TN and completed his undergraduate studies in International Policy at Vanderbilt University. He then joined Teach for America as a science teacher at Fremont High School in South Los Angeles, California before attending medical school at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, TN. He returned to Los Angeles for a combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency at Los Angeles County-University of Southern California and then completed fellowship in pediatric cardiology at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford. He is excited to begin his advanced fellowship in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

Electrophysiology Fellows

  • Perino, Alexander
    Dr. Perino received his MD from the University of Colorado before coming to Stanford to train, where he currently serves as a Chief Fellow for the Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship while training in Cardiac Electrophysiology. Alex has been heavily involved in research while at Stanford with the goal of cultivating the skills necessary to become an independent researcher. Projects have included: 1) investigation of citation bias (the selective citation of published results to support findings, arguments, or interests of authors or other stakeholders) in the atrial fibrillation ablation literature, demonstrating that reported ablation success rate is an independent predictor of citation rate; 2) utilizing clinical and administrative data to demonstrate reduced risk of stroke and death for patients with newly-diagnosed atrial fibrillation who receive early cardiology care; and 3) taking the lead, from project conception to funding award to publication, on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the totality of the atrial fibrillation ablation literature base. This project is the largest of its kind with respect to volume of literature reviewed and data abstracted from included studies. Current funded work includes investigation of the intersection between atrial fibrillation and heart failure.
  • Shah, Rajan
  • Kapoor, Ridhima
    Dr. Kapoor grew up in Bloomington, Minnesota. She graduated from University of Minnesota with Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biomedical Engineering and went on to work in the medical device industry. Clinical medicine, however, quickly enticed her away from this career. She attended Chicago Medical School, where she went on to complete her M.S. in Health Administration in addition to M.D. She completed her internal medicine residency and cardiology fellowship at Medical College of Wisconsin. She served as the Chief Fellow for the Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship. She had the opportunity to pursue clinical research in electrophysiology, including projects assessing tachyarrhythmia discriminators in ICDs and atrial fibrillation ablation procedural outcomes.
  • Lin, Jeffrey
    Dr. Jeff Lin grew up near Stanford and attended Northwestern University's combined BA/MD program. He completed his internal medicine residency and a chief residency at the University of Wisconsin. His interest in electrophysiology began in medical school with his research on AF ablation outcomes. During residency, his work broadened to include device-related outcomes including the identification of predictors for CRT response and procedural aspects of CIED implantation. At Stanford, he is currently involved in projects related to AF detection and clinical characteristics of silent AF. He plans to pursue an academic career in clinical electrophysiology with a particular interest in AF and heart failure outcomes.

Interventional Fellows

  • Markham, Ryan
    Dr Ryan Markham graduated with a Medical Bachelor & Bachelor of Surgery, from the School of Medicine at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. He completed his general and interventional cardiology fellowships at The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. He has published extensively in the field of interventional cardiology and is the director of Likemed™ a medical education website for medical students. He is currently involved in a number of projects focussing on mitral valve annular geometry, durability of transcatheter mitral valve repair and the development of transcatheter mitral valve repair devices.
  • Chan, Kwong Yue "Eric"
    Dr. Eric Chan was born and raised in Hong Kong where he received his medical education in the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong. After graduating in 2009, he underwent training in Internal Medicine as well as Cardiology in Queen Mary Hospital. He was initially trained in cardiovascular imaging including echocardiography for cardiac surgery and structural heart interventions. He then assumed a unique, hybrid role as an interventionist as well, taking part in coronary angioplasty as well as structural heart interventions. He is also fervently interested in CIED implantations including cardiac resynchronization therapy, subcutaneous ICD and leadless pacemakers.

    Apart from his clinical services, he is also involved in studies on coronary stenting and OCT conducted in the University of Hong Kong, as well as training of medical students such as echocardiography workshops. He is also the executive producer of Hong Kong Valve, a regionally renowned heart team conference. His vision is to improve the outcomes of patients with advanced heart failure through evolving transcatheter therapies.

Heart Failure and Transplant Fellows

  • Avula, Harshith "Hershey"
    Dr. Harshith (Hershey) Avula grew up in Fresno, California prior to attending Stanford University and receiving his degree in political science. After graduating from Stanford University, Dr. Avula attended the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine where he was a member of the Program in Medical Education – Health Equities (PRIME-HEq) track and Gold Humanism Honor Society. During his medical school training, Dr. Avula concurrently received a Master’s degree in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health where he engaged in research exploring socio-demographic bias in smoking cessation advice and was a member of the health policy and management track. After his medical and public health education, Dr. Avula completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania as a member of the Health Leadership in Quality track, prior to returning to the bay area where he completed his general Cardiology fellowship at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California training program. During his fellowship training, Dr. Avula has been actively engaged in epidemiologic and outcomes research as a co-investigator on multiple projects within the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research. His research has included published work on long-term outcomes in heart failure patients and ongoing investigations of incident heart failure and outcomes in vulnerable populations, including persons living with HIV. Dr. Avula hopes that his ongoing research and training will help advance our understanding of why selected populations of patients with heart failure experience adverse events, and ultimately hopes to help prevent at-risk patients from developing heart failure and improve outcomes in vulnerable populations with heart failure.
  • Chang, Lee
    Lee Chang graduated from Stanford University with degrees in Economics and Biology and worked as a health policy analyst before receiving his MD from the UCSF School of Medicine. He completed his internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he conducted outcomes research on coronary heart disease. After returning to Stanford as a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow, he obtained NIH funding to apply machine learning techniques to develop risk prediction models for coronary heart disease and ischemic cardiomyopathy. His goal is to specialize in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology and investigate the predictors that drive clinical outcomes for these patients.

  • Sandhu, Alexander
    Alex Sandhu went to Northwestern University in their combined BA/MD program where he majored in economics. He came to Stanford for the internal medicine global health residency track. During residency, he did research on hypertension epidemiology in Uganda. Following residency, he completed his VA fellowship in Health Services Research before starting cardiology fellowship. He has been involved with Medicare's transition to value-based payment models for clinicians. His interests are in implementation and health policy research targeting the quality and cost of heart failure care.

Echo/Imaging Fellow

  • Tuzovic, Mirela
    I was born in Sarajevo, Bosnia and I immigrated to Redwood City as a war refugee at age 9. As an undergraduate, I studied mechanical engineering at Stanford University. After working for two years as a mechanical design engineer in the aerospace industry, my desire to directly impact the lives of others led me to medical school. I graduated from the University of Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and then completed my internal medicine residency at Stanford Medical Center. I’m arriving at Stanford after completing a general cardiology fellowship at UCLA Medical Center where my focus was in the clinical care and research of cardio-oncology patients. I am excited to return to the Bay Area and to Stanford for an advanced fellowship in cardiovascular imaging.