2018-2019 Cardiovascular Medicine Fellows

The mission is to train leaders in academic cardiology for the 21st century. In accord with this mission, the cardiovascular medicine training program at Stanford University has been developed to offer a wide range of opportunities leading to a career in academic cardiology. Emphasis is placed on selection of applicants with strong clinical and research backgrounds. Below you will find a list of our current Fellows at Stanford School of Medicine. 

Chief Fellows

  • Chang, Lee
    Dr. Lee  Chang graduated from Stanford University with degrees in Economics and Biology and worked at Acumen, LLC as a health policy analyst before receiving his MD from UCSF School of Medicine. As a medical student, he evaluated the evidence behind FDA approval of medical devices and identified significant reporting bias of clinical trials for cardiovascular devices. He completed his internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he conducted outcomes research on coronary heart disease. After returning to Stanford as a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow, his research interest lies in using computational methods including machine learning to develop risk prediction models for coronary heart disease and ischemic cardiomyopathy, for which he has received NIH F32 funding. His goal is to specialize in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology and investigate the predictors that drive clinical outcomes for these patients.
  • Perino, Alexander
    Dr. Perino received his MD from the University of Colorado before coming to Stanford to train, where he currently serves as a Chief Fellow for the Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship while training in Cardiac Electrophysiology. Alex has been heavily involved in research while at Stanford with the goal of cultivating the skills necessary to become an independent researcher. Projects have included: 1) investigation of citation bias (the selective citation of published results to support findings, arguments, or interests of authors or other stakeholders) in the atrial fibrillation ablation literature, demonstrating that reported ablation success rate is an independent predictor of citation rate; 2) utilizing clinical and administrative data to demonstrate reduced risk of stroke and death for patients with newly-diagnosed atrial fibrillation who receive early cardiology care; and 3) taking the lead, from project conception to funding award to publication, on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the totality of the atrial fibrillation ablation literature base. This project is the largest of its kind with respect to volume of literature reviewed and data abstracted from included studies. Current funded work includes investigation of the intersection between atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

First Year Fellows

  • Beach, Leila
    Dr. Leila Yeh Beach studied chemistry as an undergraduate at Stanford before going on to earn her MD from the UCSF School of Medicine. During this period, she spent a year in Beijing investigating the heparin contamination incident alongside teams from the FDA and Peking University. She subsequently completed her internal medicine residency at UCSF where she conducted research regarding cardiovascular health outcomes disparities along race and ethnic lines. She is now back at Stanford for her cardiology fellowship and hopes to apply her research interest in racial and ethnic disparities to her clinical interest in heart failure and transplant. 
  • Chang, Andrew
    Dr. Chang was born in Columbus, but grew up in Phoenix, Honolulu, and Las Vegas. He went to college at Yale University, then received his MD from Stanford. He completed his residency training in the global health track of Stanford's internal medicine program in 2016 and served as chief resident in 2017. He earned an MS in Epidemiology from Stanford as well. He is interested in studying cardiovascular disease in global vulnerable populations, and is currently conducting mixed methods research, epidemiological profiling, and cost-effectiveness analyses of rheumatic heart disease in East Africa. He intends to pursue a career in global health research with a clinical focus on echocardiography. 
  • Kalwani, Neil
    Dr. Kalwani grew up in Indiana and attended college at Yale University.  He then completed an MD and MPP at Harvard University and trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, where he completed the Management Leadership Track.  He plans to become an academic cardiologist, focusing on health services research and health care management.  His goal is to identify and implement policies and delivery models that improve the value of care provided to patients with cardiovascular disease.
  • Sarraju, Ashish
    Dr. Sarraju grew up in India and attended college at Boston University, where he studied Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He spent a year after college at the Massachusetts General Hospital, working on targeted iron-based nanoparticle delivery. He attended medical school at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He went on to complete internal medicine residency at Stanford and served as a Chief Resident in 2017-2018. He plans to continue a career in academic cardiology with a clinical and research focus on cardiovascular disease prevention and lipidology. 
  • Wayda, Brian
    Dr. Brian Wayda received his MD at Yale University and completed internal medicine residency training at Columbia University Medical Center. Now a cardiology fellow at Stanford, he plans to pursue an academic career in advanced heart failure and transplant. He has conducted research investigating racial and socioeconomic disparities in outcomes after heart transplant and myocardial infarction, and is now engaged in research on the comparative effectiveness and safety of immunosuppression regimens after transplant. Prior to his medical training, he obtained bachelor’s degrees in Physics and Economics and an MPH at Yale, and spent two years with the Clinton Foundation in Mozambique and South Africa.
  • Woo, Jennifer
    Dr. Woo grew up in Los Angeles, California and attended college at Brown University. She completed her MD and internal medicine and pediatrics residency at UCLA. There she developed a primary care clinical decision support tool and a heart failure app, "My Big Heart," which allows providers and patients to track their symptoms, medications and activity. She was the recipient of the Barbara Streisand research award for her work on implementing a preventive cardiology teen text-messaging program. She chose Stanford for cardiology fellowship for its strong program, quality teaching and excellent mentors. She plans to focus on cardiac imaging and adult-congenital cardiology. She is interested in computational assessments of diagnostic tools, data mining, and modeling algorithms. 

Second Year Fellows

  • Clarke, Lee (Shoa)
    Dr. Clarke grew up in Portland, Maine and attended college at Cornell University. He completed his MD and PhD at Stanford School of Medicine, where he studied computational and evolutionary genomics. He then went on to complete internal medicine and pediatrics residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital. He plans to become a basic scientist with a research focus on cardiovascular risk genetics and clinical focus on preventive cardiology. His goal is to identify both adults and children who have high genetic risk for cardiovascular disease in order to provide early treatment with a family centered approach.
  • Gerber, Daniel
  • Lin, Jeffrey
    Dr. Lin was born and raised down the street from Stanford before going to Northwestern for its combined BA-MD program. As a medical student, he was introduced early on to the field of electrophysiology and created the foundation for what would become Northwestern's AF ablation outcomes database. He then went on to the University of Wisconsin for residency and a chief residency, where he worked on predictors of CRT response and procedural outcomes related to CIED implantation. He plans to pursue a career in clinical electrophysiology with a research interest in AF - heart failure outcomes.
  • Ouyang, David
    Dr. David Ouyang is a native of Houston, Texas and graduated from Rice University with a degree in Statistics and Biochemistry. He went to medical school at UCSF, where he was in the Clinical and Translational Research Pathway. He was at Stanford for Internal Medicine residency, where he focused on research with the electronic medical record system. David is interesting interested in a career in academic cardiology and is interested in applying Data Science and Deep Learning to Echocardiography. 
  • Parizo, Justin
    Dr. Parizo was born in Southern California and attended UCLA for undergrad where he majored in physiology and developed a strong interest in global health. He travelled north to UCSF for medical school where he researched malaria molecular epidemiology. Between his third and fourth years he further pursued this interest through a Fulbright Fellowship in India during which he investigated an urban malaria outbreak in Ahmedabad, India. For residency he moved down the Peninsula to Stanford where his exposure to cardiology convinced him change his focus. At Stanford he has found his path in heart failure, MCS and transplant. He plans to pursue a career in this area with a research focus on outcomes and disparities in advanced heart failure and advanced therapies.
  • Zhu, Han
    Dr. Zhu grew up in Michigan, in a suburb of Detroit called Canton. She then went on to receive her Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). There, she fell in love with cardiovascular biology working in the lab of Dr. Elazer Edelman (MD/PhD). She went to medical school at Case Western Reserve University and worked in the lab of Dr. Mukesh Jain (MD) and Dr. Saptarsi Haldar (MD) on cardiomyocyte exercise biology and metabolism. She then did a Sarnoff Cardiovascular Fellowship in the lab of Dr. Anthony Rosenzweig (MD) at HMS working on  the role of microRNA in cardiomyocyte physiologic hypertrophy and exercise. She did her internal medicine residency at Stanford and is now in her second year of cardiology fellowship at Stanford. Long-term, she is interested in studying the role of inflammation in cardiomyocyte pathology. She also has an interest in cardio-oncology and the role of cancer therapeutics on cardiovascular toxicity.

Research Fellows

  • Chang, Lee
    Dr. Lee  Chang graduated from Stanford University with degrees in Economics and Biology and worked at Acumen, LLC as a health policy analyst before receiving his MD from UCSF School of Medicine. As a medical student, he evaluated the evidence behind FDA approval of medical devices and identified significant reporting bias of clinical trials for cardiovascular devices. He completed his internal medicine training at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he conducted outcomes research on coronary heart disease. After returning to Stanford as a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow, his research interest lies in using computational methods including machine learning to develop risk prediction models for coronary heart disease and ischemic cardiomyopathy, for which he has received NIH F32 funding. His goal is to specialize in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology and investigate the predictors that drive clinical outcomes for these patients.
  • Cheng, Paul
    Dr. Paul Cheng received his BEng in Chemical Engineering and BSc in biology at MIT, where he worked in the Wittrup lab  engineering antibody mimetic. He subsequently completed his MD/PhD at UCSF working in the Srivastava lab studying how a variety of morphogenic signals, including extracellular matrix, miRNA, and Wnt/Notch signaling affect the development and fate determination of cardiac progenitors. After finishing an internal medicine residency at Stanford, Paul has continued at Stanford as a fellow in cardiology. He is currently investigating molecular mechanisms underlying genetic risk factors for human cardiovascular disease with particular interest in coronary artery disease and cardiac amyloidosis. 
  • Mamic, Petra
    Dr. Petra Mamic began her medical education in Croatia at the University of Zagreb. She then moved to the U.S. to get a degree in Molecular Biology at Loyola University Chicago, before going to Harvard Medical School to obtain her MD. After completing her internal medicine training at Stanford, she stayed on as a Cardiovascular Medicine fellow. Her research focuses on the role of the gut microbiome in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis, development of complications, response to therapy, and long-term outcomes. Supported by the NIH F32 funding, she is currently studying the role of the gut microbiome-host metabolome interactions in development of insulin resistance in chronic heart failure. Dr. Mamic’s goal is to specialize in advanced heart failure and transplant cardiology, while continuing to build a microbiome-centered cardiovascular research program.  
  • Rogers, Albert (AJ)
    Dr. A.J. Rogers is a Cardiovascular Medicine Clinical and Research Fellow at Stanford University. He began working with medical technology as an undergraduate in biomedical engineering at Duke University and earned his medical degree and MBA from the University of North Carolina. His experience includes bench engineering science, clinical research, and medical device development and entrepreneurship. He completed Internal Medicine residency and clinical Cardiology training at Stanford University and joined Dr. Sanjiv Narayan’s laboratory investigating the mechanisms of cardiac fibrillation. He plans to pursue further training in clinical electrophysiology and launch a career as a physician-scientist in clinical electrophysiology.
  • Sandhu, Alexander
    Dr Sandhu grew up in Southern California. He studied economics at Northwestern University where he also completed medical school in the 7 year combined BA/MD program. Alex came to Stanford for his internal medicine residency as part of the global health track. During residency, he performed research on the epidemiology of hypertension and the economics of rheumatic heart disease. He subsequently completed a fellowship and Master's Degree in Health Services Research at Stanford's Center for Health Policy/Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His work focused on the cost-effectiveness of heart failure therapies. Alex plans a career as a clinician-scientist with a clinical focus on advanced heart failure management and research focusing on the intersection of cardiovascular quality of care and health policy. He hopes to evaluate and advance interventions in policy or disease management that potentially improve the value of cardiovascular care.
  • Yen, Alberta

Non-ACGME Fellows

  • O'Brien, Connor

Adult Congenital Heart Disease

  • Morello, Melissa
  • Schultz, Karen

Electrophysiology Fellows

  • Perino, Alexander
    Dr. Perino received his MD from the University of Colorado before coming to Stanford to train, where he currently serves as a Chief Fellow for the Cardiovascular Medicine Fellowship while training in Cardiac Electrophysiology. Alex has been heavily involved in research while at Stanford with the goal of cultivating the skills necessary to become an independent researcher. Projects have included: 1) investigation of citation bias (the selective citation of published results to support findings, arguments, or interests of authors or other stakeholders) in the atrial fibrillation ablation literature, demonstrating that reported ablation success rate is an independent predictor of citation rate; 2) utilizing clinical and administrative data to demonstrate reduced risk of stroke and death for patients with newly-diagnosed atrial fibrillation who receive early cardiology care; and 3) taking the lead, from project conception to funding award to publication, on a systematic review and meta-analysis of the totality of the atrial fibrillation ablation literature base. This project is the largest of its kind with respect to volume of literature reviewed and data abstracted from included studies. Current funded work includes investigation of the intersection between atrial fibrillation and heart failure.
  • Shah, Rajan
  • Dong, Yan (Julie)
  • Singh, Jaskanwal (Sonny)
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Interventional Fellows

  • Kang, Guson
  • Kobayashi, Yuhei
  •  

Heart Failure and Transplant Fellows

  • Alexander, Kevin
  • Czobor, Peter
  • Tremblay-Gravel, Maxime
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Echo/Imaging Fellow

  • Wang, Cindy