About Us

Dr. Thomas Quertermous and Dr. Alan Yeung

Welcome to the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, a dynamic and innovative center dedicated to excellence in research, medical education, and clinical care. Our division is driven by over 40 faculty, clinician educators and instructors who are the pillar of strength in the Division’s ongoing efforts into the prevention, and treatment of cardiovascular disease.

Heart disease is the cause of more than one in four deaths in the United States. The Division of Cardiovascular Medicine is known for its innovative approach to the diagnosis, and development of long-term strategies for patients at risk or with a history of heart disease. Our faculty members are experts in Interventional Cardiology, Electrophysiology, Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplantation, Cardiac Imaging and Vascular Medicine and have developed research, teaching and patient care programs in all these areas.

In addition to innovative research and the highest quality of patient care, faculty in the division are actively involved in the inspiration, education, and training the next generation of academicians specializing in cardiovascular medicine. Along with the structured and formal fellowship training programs medicine house staff rotates through the cardiology consult service at the VA Hospital and through the cardiology consult service, the cardiology inpatient service, and the coronary care unit at Stanford University. Division faculty regularly participates in resident morning report, noon-time resident educational conferences, and Medical Grand Rounds.

Cardiovascular Medicine Timeline

1968

First adult human heart transplant in the United States

Norman Shumway successfully transplants a heart into 54-year-old steelworker Mike Kasperak, who survives for 14 days.

1968

Discovery that insulin resistance is the principal physiologic characteristic of mild type-II diabetes and obesity

Researchers John Farquhar and Gerald Reaven discover the principal physiological characteristic of type-2 diabetes is insulin resistance.

1971

First multicenter trial to demonstrate that lowering cholesterol levels prevents heart disease

John Farquhar and Peter Wood lead the first large clinical investigation that shows lowering cholesterol levels prevents heart disease.

1972

First U.S. trial of community-wide health education for preventing heart disease

John Farquhar and Peter Wood conduct the first large-scale education about the treatment and prevention of heart disease.

1975

First U.S. trial of community-wide health education for preventing heart disease

John Farquhar and Peter Wood conduct the first large-scale education about the treatment and prevention of heart disease.

1981

First successful human combined heart/lung transplant in the world (fourth attempted worldwide)

Mary Gohlke receives the world's first combined heart and lung transplant in a landmark operation led by surgeon Bruce Reitz.

1993

First demonstration that lifestyle changes and drug therapy decrease heart attack rates and slows progression of atherosclerosis in coronary arteries

Researcher William Haskell shows that intensive lifestyle changes and  prevention/treatment programs can reduce cardiac events and slow the progression of atherosclerosis in coronary arteries.

1999

1,000th heart transplant performed at Stanford Hospital

 

2013

First catheter based deactivation of a left ventricular assist device after myocardial recovery