Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Aug. 5, 2019
Vol. 11, No. 14
Novel rheumatoid arthritis drug succeeds in clinical trial

Novel rheumatoid arthritis drug succeeds in clinical trial

In a large trial led by a Stanford investigator, an experimental drug produced clinically meaningful improvements for rheumatoid arthritis patients unresponsive to existing treatments.

 
 
Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds
 

Stanford team stimulates neurons to induce particular perceptions in mice's minds

Stanford scientists, using only direct brain stimulation, reproduced both the brain dynamics and the behavioral response of mice taught to discriminate between two different images.

 
Drug combo heralds major shift in chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment
 

Drug combo heralds major shift in chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment

A large multicenter clinical trial led by Stanford physician Tait Shanafelt, MD, indicates that people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia may forgo chemotherapy in favor of new, targeted treatments.

 
Researchers identify possible drug target for deadly heart condition
 

Researchers identify possible drug target for deadly heart condition

Stanford researchers have uncovered how a genetic mutation contributes to a heart disease known as familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Existing drugs correct the defect in heart cells grown in a petri dish, suggesting a new therapeutic target.

 
New ‘don’t eat me’ signal may provide basis for cancer therapies
 

New ‘don’t eat me’ signal may provide basis for cancer therapies

Cancer cells are known to protect themselves using proteins that tell immune cells not to attack them. Stanford researchers have discovered a new “don’t eat me” signal, and blocking it may make cancer cells vulnerable to attack by the immune system.

 
School readiness impaired in preschoolers with ADHD symptoms
 

School readiness impaired in preschoolers with ADHD symptoms

In a Stanford study, 79 percent of preschoolers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were not ready for school, compared with 13 percent of other children.

 
Stanford Health Care lauded for quality, transparency during Joint Commission survey

Stanford Health Care lauded for quality, transparency during Joint Commission survey

When surveyors from The Joint Commission conducted their triennial accreditation survey earlier this summer, Stanford Health Care passed with flying colors.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Lisa Chamberlain, Lorinda Chung, Brad Zuchero and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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