Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
June 24, 2019
Vol. 11, No. 12
Graduates urged to embrace lifelong learning, adapt to change at medical school’s 111th commencement

Graduates urged to embrace lifelong learning, adapt to change at medical school’s 111th commencement

“In a world that encourages increasing specialization, hold on to that sense of being a student,” Stanford Provost Persis Drell told Stanford School of Medicine graduates.

 
 
Medical marijuana does not reduce opioid deaths
 

Medical marijuana does not reduce opioid deaths

Revisiting a 2014 study that suggested states with medical marijuana saw fewer opioid deaths, Stanford researchers in fact found no connection between marijuana availability and fatal opioid overdoses.

 
Stanford physicians train fire departments in latest emergency medicine techniques
 

Stanford physicians train fire departments in latest emergency medicine techniques

The Stanford Department of Emergency Medicine is working with nine local fire departments to ensure that crews learn the latest protocols for treating community members during health emergencies.

 
Most metastatic colorectal cancers have spread before diagnosis
 

Most metastatic colorectal cancers have spread before diagnosis

Colorectal cancers often spread before the initial tumor is detected, according to a new Stanford study. Identifying patients in whom early metastasis is likely could better guide treatment decisions.

 
5 Questions: Bert Hurlbut on ensuring new Stanford Hospital is earthquake-safe
 

5 Questions: Bert Hurlbut on ensuring new Stanford Hospital is earthquake-safe

Bert Hurlbut, vice president of new hospital construction at Stanford Health Care, discussed the strategies his team used to make the new Stanford Hospital earthquake-resistant.

 
Two genes implicated in development of prostate enlargement
 

Two genes implicated in development of prostate enlargement

Stanford scientists have identified a genetic signature that signals enlarged prostate tissue. The discovery has helped them find possible drivers of the condition.

 
Antibody treatment allows transplant of mismatched stem cells, tissues in mice
 

Antibody treatment allows transplant of mismatched stem cells, tissues in mice

If the antibody treatment is eventually found to be viable in humans, it could increase the numbers of people who benefit from hematopoietic stem transplants, Stanford researchers said.

 
Stanford Medicine magazine brings joy of discovery into focus

Stanford Medicine magazine brings joy of discovery into focus

The new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine highlights fundamental research at Stanford and the many ways in which scientists are exploring the science of life.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Mark Berry, Michael Longaker, Joanna Wysocka and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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