Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
March 25, 2019
Vol. 11, No. 6
Eighty-five medical students meet their matches

Eighty-five medical students meet their matches

On March 15, Stanford medical students nervously awaited the moment they could find out where they had matched for their residencies.

 
 
Drug could alleviate side effects of chemo for breast cancer patients
 

Drug could alleviate side effects of chemo for breast cancer patients

Stanford researchers have found a way to predict who will suffer heart problems from a common breast-cancer drug, as well as identified an FDA-approved medication that could mitigate those side effects.

 
Immune profile two days after stroke predicts dementia a year later
 

Immune profile two days after stroke predicts dementia a year later

Stanford researchers have found that transient changes in the numbers and activation levels of a handful of circulating immune cell types can predict the likelihood of dementia one year after a stroke.

 
Democracy linked to global health gains in low-, middle-income countries
 

Democracy linked to global health gains in low-, middle-income countries

The role of democracy in public health leads to dramatic decreases in deaths from noncommunicable diseases, HIV, cardiovascular disease and transportation injuries, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford and several other institutions.

 
Molecular data can predict breast cancer recurrence
 

Molecular data can predict breast cancer recurrence

Some breast cancers return decades later. Now, a researcher at Stanford, joined by collaborators at several other institutions, has subcategorized tumors to predict recurrence, guide treatment decisions and improve drug development.

 
Modified immune cells issue alert when detecting cancer in mice
 

Modified immune cells issue alert when detecting cancer in mice

Stanford scientists were able to engineer immune cells known as macrophages to detect and flag cancer in mice. The researchers hope the technique can be used for early cancer diagnostics in humans.

 
Apple Heart Study demonstrates ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation

Apple Heart Study demonstrates ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation

Stanford researchers presented preliminary findings from a virtual study that enrolled more than 400,000 participants.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Greg Albers, Julie Kauer, Samuel So  and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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