Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Jan. 28, 2019
Vol. 11, No. 2
Researchers discover the brain cells that make pain unpleasant

Researchers discover the brain cells that make pain unpleasant

Pain sensation and the emotional experience of pain are not the same, and now, in mice, scientists at Stanford have found the neurons responsible for the latter.

 
 
Protein promotes small artery growth to damaged heart tissue in mice
 

Protein promotes small artery growth to damaged heart tissue in mice

Stanford scientists have discovered a molecule that promotes the growth of collateral arteries in mice. The finding could open the door to developing therapies that help heal heart tissues damaged by disease or heart attack in humans.

 
Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice
 

Engineered immune cells target broad range of pediatric solid tumors in mice

In mouse studies, a Stanford-led team has developed an engineered immune cell that eliminates several types of childhood tumors. The innovation may help patients with relapsed or metastatic disease.

 
When activated, ‘social’ brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice
 

When activated, ‘social’ brain circuits inhibit feeding behavior in mice

Researchers at Stanford demonstrated that direct stimulation of fewer than two dozen neurons linked to social interaction was enough to suppress a mouse’s drive to feed itself.

 
Scientists generate, track development of myelin-producing brain cells
 

Scientists generate, track development of myelin-producing brain cells

Studying human oligodendrocytes, which provide insulation for nerve cells, has been challenging. But a new way of generating stem-cell-derived, three-dimensional brain-cell cultures is paying off.

 
Computer memory
 

Computer memory

A Stanford neuroscience team is building a digital hippocampus to better understand the area of our brain that helps us form and retain memories.

 
Short-term hospital readmissions for gun injuries cost $86 million a year

Short-term hospital readmissions for gun injuries cost $86 million a year

A study from Stanford researchers has found that readmissions account for 9.5 percent of the $911 million spent annually on gun-injury hospitalizations.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Megan Albertelli, Nidhi Rohatgi, Joy Wu and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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