Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Dec. 10, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 22
Stanford Medicine staff help humans, animals in wake of Camp Fire

Stanford Medicine staff help humans, animals in wake of Camp Fire

Health care providers and veterinary technicians from Stanford volunteered to help humans and animals affected by the most destructive fire in California’s history.

 
 
Artificial intelligence rivals radiologists in screening X-rays for certain diseases
 

Artificial intelligence rivals radiologists in screening X-rays for certain diseases

In a matter of seconds, a new algorithm read chest X-rays for 14 pathologies, performing as well as radiologists in most cases, a Stanford-led study says.

 
Surgical adhesions can be treated, prevented in mice
 

Surgical adhesions can be treated, prevented in mice

Fibrous adhesions that form after abdominal surgery may be preventable or treatable, according to Stanford study. Adhesions affect most surgical patients, and treating them costs over $1 billion annually.

 
‘Chemo brain’ caused by malfunction in three types of brain cells
 

‘Chemo brain’ caused by malfunction in three types of brain cells

Three types of cells in the brain’s white matter show interwoven problems during the cognitive dysfunction that follows treatment with the cancer drug methotrexate, Stanford neuroscientists have found.

 
Home videos of children can be scored to diagnose autism
 

Home videos of children can be scored to diagnose autism

Algorithms generated through machine learning can sort through observations of children’s behavior in short home videos to determine if the children have autism, a Stanford study has shown.

 
Opioid prescriptions from dentists linked to youth addiction risk
 

Opioid prescriptions from dentists linked to youth addiction risk

In teenagers and young adults, receiving opioids from dental providers is linked with elevated risk for continued opioid use and abuse, a Stanford study has found.

 
Honeybee protein keeps stem cells youthful
 

Honeybee protein keeps stem cells youthful

An active protein component of royal jelly helps honeybees create new queens. Stanford researchers have identified a similar protein in mammals, which keeps cultured embryonic stem cells pluripotent.

 
Medical school space, finances focus of town hall meeting

Medical school space, finances focus of town hall meeting

Adding buildings and moving research and administrative operations to off-campus locations will allow the School of Medicine to rebuild on campus and meet its growing need for space, school leaders say.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Raffi Avedian, Sarah Donaldson, Kevin Wang and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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