Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Sept. 10, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 16
Ketamine’s antidepressive effects tied to opioid system in brain

Ketamine’s antidepressive effects tied to opioid system in brain

Ketamine’s antidepressive effects require activation of opioid receptors in the brain, a new Stanford study shows. The surprising finding may alter how new antidepressants are developed and administered in order to mitigate the risk of opioid dependence.

 
 
Stanford Medicine honors Christopher Dawes, a transformational leader
 

Stanford Medicine honors Christopher Dawes, a transformational leader

The longtime CEO of Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford has retired after nearly three decades of shaping health care for children and expectant mothers.

 
Drought predictive of decrease in snakebites
 

Drought predictive of decrease in snakebites

Rattlesnake bites, contrary to public opinion, increase after periods of high rainfall, not drought, according to a Stanford-led study that examined 20 years of snakebite history in California.

 
Researchers’ model could help stem opioid crisis
 

Researchers’ model could help stem opioid crisis

Increasing the availability of naloxone, cutting opioid prescriptions by 25 percent and expanding drug-treatment programs could reduce opioid-related deaths by 6,000 over 10 years, Stanford researchers estimate.

 
Diseased heart muscle cells have abnormally shortened telomeres
 

Diseased heart muscle cells have abnormally shortened telomeres

Patients with cardiomyopathy have abnormally short telomeres in the cells responsible for heart contraction, Stanford researchers find. This disease hallmark opens new pathways for drug discovery.

 
Researchers can forecast risk of deadly vascular condition from genome sequence
 

Researchers can forecast risk of deadly vascular condition from genome sequence

By combining genome-sequence information and health records, Stanford scientists have developed a new algorithm that can predict the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm, and potentially could be used for any number of diseases.

 
African armed conflict kills more children indirectly than in actual fighting
 

African armed conflict kills more children indirectly than in actual fighting

A Stanford-led analysis of the indirect impact of armed conflict in Africa shows that as many as 3.5 million infants born within 30 miles of combat were killed over two decades.

 
Stanford Medicine magazine explores a shared vision for health care, education and research

Stanford Medicine magazine explores a shared vision for health care, education and research

The summer issue of Stanford Medicine highlights research and programs that reflect a shared vision for the future of the School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

 

  

  


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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