Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Aug. 6, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 14
Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions

Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions

Wearing a device that identifies other people’s facial expressions can help children with autism develop better social skills, a Stanford pilot study has demonstrated.

 
 
Study links depression to low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine
 

Study links depression to low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine

Investigators at Stanford and elsewhere have shown, for the first time in humans, that low blood levels of acetyl-L-carnitine track with the severity and duration of depression.

 
Diabetic-level glucose spikes seen in healthy people
 

Diabetic-level glucose spikes seen in healthy people

A study out of Stanford in which blood sugar levels were continuously monitored reveals that even people who think they’re “healthy” should pay attention to what they eat.

 
Gut bacteria byproduct protects against Salmonella
 

Gut bacteria byproduct protects against Salmonella

A molecule called propionate inhibits the growth of Salmonella in mice and may be a promising new treatment for people sickened by the pathogen, according to a new Stanford study.

 
Osteoporosis, fracture risk predicted with genetic screen
 

Osteoporosis, fracture risk predicted with genetic screen

A new genetic screen may be able to predict low bone-mineral density, osteoporosis and fracture risk prior to clinical symptoms, according to a retrospective study of nearly 400,000 people by a Stanford researcher.

 
Study finds end-of-life conversations with nonclinical worker bring patient satisfaction, lower costs
 

Study finds end-of-life conversations with nonclinical worker bring patient satisfaction, lower costs

The findings suggest that patients with a serious illness are more at ease with decisions about their care when they discuss their care preferences with someone outside the medical context, according to Stanford researchers.

 
Key social reward circuit in the brain impaired in kids with autism
 

Key social reward circuit in the brain impaired in kids with autism

Deficits in the brain’s reward circuit are linked to social deficits in children with autism and may point the way toward better treatments, according to a new Stanford study.

 
Technologies started at Stanford Biodesign have reached more than 1.5 million patients

Technologies started at Stanford Biodesign have reached more than 1.5 million patients

Stanford Biodesign trainees have developed new medical devices and diagnostics that have been used to help care for more than 1.5 million patients so far.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Julia Chandler, Robert Dodd, Stephen Montgomery, Natalie Torok and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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