Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
July 16, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 13
Program marks 30 years of bringing medical education to low-income teens

Program marks 30 years of bringing medical education to low-income teens

More than 700 students, 30 summers, zero tuition: The no-cost Stanford Medical Youth Science Program helps aspiring low-income teens begin their journey toward careers in the medical and health sciences.

 
 
Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings
 

Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings

The epidemic of physician burnout may be the source of even more medical errors than unsafe medical workplace conditions, a new study led by Stanford researchers has found.

 
Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people
 

Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people

Scientists at Stanford used the wire to capture free-floating tumor cells in the blood, a technique that soon could be used in humans to yield an earlier cancer diagnosis.

 
Study solves mystery of genetic-test results for patient with suspected heart condition
 

Study solves mystery of genetic-test results for patient with suspected heart condition

Stanford researchers used genetic-editing tools and stem cell technology to uncover whether a genetic mutation linked to a heart rhythm disorder was benign or pathogenic.

 
Rare disease inspires team to develop new test for aldehyde levels in blood
 

Rare disease inspires team to develop new test for aldehyde levels in blood

Fanconi anemia is a rare but deadly disease thought to be the result of aldehyde-induced DNA damage. Now, Stanford researchers are developing a test that could help kids with the disease and millions more with related conditions.

 
Nicotine-mimicking drugs could help treat inflammatory diseases
 

Nicotine-mimicking drugs could help treat inflammatory diseases

Stanford researchers discovered that a receptor that binds to nicotine and to clusters of beta-amyloid molecules is found on certain types of immune cells that can act as suppressors and regulators of the immune system.

 
Sound research

Sound research

Researchers use sound and acoustics to advance health research.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Aisling Chaney, Ronald Davis, Humsa Venkatesh and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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