Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
June 25, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 12
Speakers stress importance of science, empathy at med school’s 110th commencement

Speakers stress importance of science, empathy at med school’s 110th commencement

“Aim high and keep learning, be skeptical of accepted certainty and stay fast in the belief that facts matter,” Nobel laureate Paul Berg told Stanford School of Medicine graduates.

 
 
Stanford scientists discover biomarker for flu susceptibility
 

Stanford scientists discover biomarker for flu susceptibility

Scientists at Stanford are believed to be the first to have discovered a biomarker that can predict who will be most susceptible to influenza.

 
Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity risk
 

Genetic variation in progesterone receptor tied to prematurity risk

A key hormone receptor evolved quickly as or early humans migrated from Africa, producing localized gene changes that may affect modern women’s risk of preterm birth, according to a Stanford-led study.

 
New operating suites to bring advanced technology to surgery patients
 

New operating suites to bring advanced technology to surgery patients

At Packard Children’s, new surgical and imaging suites will open at the end of June, and the entire second floor of Stanford Hospital, set to open in late 2019, will be devoted to surgery.

 
5 Questions: Paul Blumenthal on contraception in India
 

5 Questions: Paul Blumenthal on contraception in India

Stanford researchers and their colleagues have tested a new contraceptive device that they say could provide broader access to long-acting contraception in developing countries.

 
Karl Deisseroth wins Kyoto Prize for seminal role in creation, use of optogenetics
 

Karl Deisseroth wins Kyoto Prize for seminal role in creation, use of optogenetics

The award, which includes a gift of 100 million yen (about $913,000), recognizes the neuroscientist for pioneering and advancing a technology for studying brain circuits.

 
Single liver donor benefits two patients — one young, one old
 

Single liver donor benefits two patients — one young, one old

Noah Hernandez, born in 2017, and James Howell, born in 1955, each benefited from a single liver to treat their life-threatening conditions.

 
5 Questions: How border separations can traumatize children

5 Questions: How border separations can traumatize children

Unplanned separation from parents is among the most damaging events a young child can experience, according to trauma research. A Stanford expert explains how it can hurt kids’ development.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Maria Borrelli, Daniel Rubin, Brad Zuchero and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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