Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
April 9, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 7
Stanford Medicine leaders introduce integrated strategic plan

Stanford Medicine leaders introduce integrated strategic plan

More than 400 faculty, staff and students assembled March 23 to hear Stanford Medicine leaders lay out the principles of an integrated strategic plan aimed at aligning the goals and priorities of the medical school and hospitals.

 
 
Physical activity helps fight genetic risk of heart disease
 

Physical activity helps fight genetic risk of heart disease

In an observational study of almost a half-million participants, Stanford researchers discovered an association between high fitness levels and low heart disease, even among those at genetic risk.

 
Tobacco products promoted on Facebook despite policies
 

Tobacco products promoted on Facebook despite policies

Several Facebook policies bar tobacco sales and promotion on the platform, but Stanford researchers found brands and vendors marketing their products through unpaid content.

 
Timing of stress-hormone pulses controls weight gain
 

Timing of stress-hormone pulses controls weight gain

A circadian code controls the switch that produces fat cells, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

 
Telomerase-expressing liver cells regenerate the organ
 

Telomerase-expressing liver cells regenerate the organ

A subset of liver cells with high levels of telomerase renews the organ during normal cell turnover and after injury, according to Stanford researchers. The cells may also give rise to liver cancer.

 
Researchers engineer yeast to manufacture complex medicine
 

Researchers engineer yeast to manufacture complex medicine

The only source of noscapine, a cough suppressant with potential anti-cancer properties, is opium poppies. Yet Stanford bioengineers have found a new way of producing the drug: reconstructing its biosynthetic pathway in yeast.

 
Scientists combine CRISPR, DNA barcoding to track cancer growth
 

Scientists combine CRISPR, DNA barcoding to track cancer growth

Cancer research that once involved years of painstaking work can now happen in months with a novel technique for studying cancer-related genes. The results reveal how combinations of mutations influence tumor growth.

 
Researchers probe the complex nature of concussions
 

Researchers probe the complex nature of concussions

Concussion is a major public health problem, but not much is known about the impacts that cause concussion or how to prevent them. A new study suggests that the problem is more complicated than previously thought.

 
Eric Shooter, founding chair of Department of Neurobiology, dies at 93

Eric Shooter, founding chair of Department of Neurobiology, dies at 93

A pioneering protein chemist at Stanford, Shooter parsed the physiological roles of key brain growth factors. He also hired and nurtured young faculty who would become highly successful scientists.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Kimberly Allison, Kevin Grimes, Lisa Knowlton and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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