Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
March 12, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 5
New neuroanatomy lab bridges virtual reality, operating room

New neuroanatomy lab bridges virtual reality, operating room

Stanford’s Department of Neurosurgery has a new anatomy lab next door to its virtual reality center. Together, the labs are a valuable resource for trainees and surgeons alike.

 
 
Researchers identify renegade cells that portend relapse in children with leukemia
 

Researchers identify renegade cells that portend relapse in children with leukemia

Analyzing individual cancer cells has enabled Stanford researchers to identify the small population of cells that spur relapse in some children with leukemia.

 
Workaround erases side effects of promising cell-based cancer therapy
 

Workaround erases side effects of promising cell-based cancer therapy

Stanford scientists created an odd couple: a modified version of an immune-signaling protein and a coordinately modified receptor for this protein. The two bind only to each other, easing an advanced anti-cancer therapy’s side effects.

 
Potential drug targets for ALS revealed in study using CRISPR
 

Potential drug targets for ALS revealed in study using CRISPR

Through genome editing, scientists at Stanford have pinpointed genes that reveal mechanistic details of ALS and may even protect against the degeneration of neurons.

 
For pregnant soldiers, recent deployment linked to higher risk of premature delivery
 

For pregnant soldiers, recent deployment linked to higher risk of premature delivery

Giving birth soon after military deployment is linked to greater risk of premature delivery, a Stanford study of U.S. servicewomen found, but deployment history itself does not raise prematurity risk.

 
Imaging agent helps predict success of lung cancer therapy
 

Imaging agent helps predict success of lung cancer therapy

With the help of a new radioactive tracer, doctors can predict with more than 80 percent accuracy how well a widely-used lung cancer drug will combat tumors, according to researchers at Stanford.

 
Why Frankenstein matters

Why Frankenstein matters

Two hundred years later, quickly advancing science makes the ethical dilemmas raised in Frankenstein still worth considering.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Agnieszka Czechowicz, Olivia Martinez, Celina Yong and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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