Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Feb. 26, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 4
Infectious-disease expert explains data via sculptures, contraptions

Infectious-disease expert explains data via sculptures, contraptions

Many infectious diseases, including malaria, are marked by cyclical ups and downs. David Schneider takes a creative approach to making sense of those ups and downs.

 
 
Low-fat or low-carb? It’s a draw, study finds
 

Low-fat or low-carb? It’s a draw, study finds

Stanford researchers have found that, contrary to previous studies, insulin levels and a specific genotype pattern don’t predict weight-loss success.

 
Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine
 

Induced pluripotent stem cells could serve as cancer vaccine

Priming the immune system with induced pluripotent stem cells prevented or slowed the development of cancer in mice, Stanford researchers found.

 
Specific set of nerve cells controls seizures’ spread through brain
 

Specific set of nerve cells controls seizures’ spread through brain

Stanford researchers have found that a small set of nerve cells in the brain regulates the debilitating seizures and cognitive deficits characteristic of the most common form of epilepsy in adults. This discovery could lead to new and better treatments.

 
Iron triggers dangerous infection in lung transplant recipients
 

Iron triggers dangerous infection in lung transplant recipients

Iron enables a common mold to take root in lung transplant recipients, according to Stanford researchers who led a study that offers a new perspective for understanding and treating these pulmonary infections.

 
5 Questions: John Ioannidis discusses large meta-analysis of antidepressants
 

5 Questions: John Ioannidis discusses large meta-analysis of antidepressants

In a highly comprehensive meta-analysis of more than 500 clinical trials, researchers from around the world have drawn conclusions about the efficacy of 21 different antidepressants.

 
Mental rehearsal prepares our minds for real-world action
 

Mental rehearsal prepares our minds for real-world action

Mentally running through a routine improves performance, but how that works isn’t clear. Now, a new tool — brain-machine interface — suggests the answer lies in how our brains prepare for action.

 
Gerald Reaven, scientist who coined ‘Syndrome X,’ dies at 89

Gerald Reaven, scientist who coined ‘Syndrome X,’ dies at 89

Gerald Reaven’s decades of research at Stanford helped show that insulin resistance could lead to Type 2 diabetes and multiple other diseases.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Aijaz Ahmed, Nishita Kothary, Ke Yuan and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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