Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Feb. 12, 2018
Vol. 10, No. 3
Cancer ‘vaccine’ eliminates tumors in mice

Cancer ‘vaccine’ eliminates tumors in mice

Activating T cells in tumors eliminated even distant metastases in mice, Stanford researchers found. Lymphoma patients are being recruited to test the technique in a clinical trial.

 
 
Newborn first in Western U.S. to have ‘bloodless’ open-heart surgery
 

Newborn first in Western U.S. to have ‘bloodless’ open-heart surgery

Lola Garcia of Hemet, California, was the smallest infant in North America to undergo such a procedure.

 
Talking to doctors about your bucket list could help advance care planning
 

Talking to doctors about your bucket list could help advance care planning

A Stanford study has has found that a majority of people make bucket lists and suggests they can be useful in doctor-patient discussions about care plans.

 
Dynamic DNA dance identified with new CRISPR/Cas9-based labeling
 

Dynamic DNA dance identified with new CRISPR/Cas9-based labeling

DNA twitches during transcription to bring distant regions in contact and enhance gene expression, according to Stanford researchers who devised a new way to label individual, nonrepetitive DNA sequences.

 
Sanitation improves health but not stunted growth in Bangladesh trial
 

Sanitation improves health but not stunted growth in Bangladesh trial

A Stanford-led study found that improving water, sanitation and hygiene in poor regions of Bangladesh helped overall health but, contrary to expectations, did not improve children’s growth.

 
Potential new treatment identified for drug-resistant skin cancer
 

Potential new treatment identified for drug-resistant skin cancer

Stanford researchers have learned how basal cell carcinoma evades drug treatment without mutating. The researchers found possible drug targets that may allow for more personalized treatment of this common skin cancer.

 
Cancer survivor hits the links again after minimally invasive heart valve replacement
 

Cancer survivor hits the links again after minimally invasive heart valve replacement

A 58-year-old woman who survived Hodgkin’s lymphoma and lung cancer needed a new heart valve, but open-heart surgery was considered too risky. So her doctor suggested a minimally invasive approach.

 
Going natural
 

Going natural

Cardiac surgeons increasingly view aortic valve repair, rather than replacement, as the best option for patient recovery.

 
5 Questions: Eugene Roh on serving as Team USA physician

5 Questions: Eugene Roh on serving as Team USA physician

A native of South Korea, the sports medicine specialist will be traveling to his home country for the Winter Olympics, where he’ll be on call to treat American athletes.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Shipra Arya, James Korndorffer, Carla Shatz, Jong Yoon and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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