Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Dec. 11, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 22
New Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford opens its doors Dec. 9

New Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford opens its doors Dec. 9

The expansion more than doubles the size of the existing pediatric and obstetric hospital campus. With the new building, the hospital will have 361 beds and can serve more patients than ever before.

 
 
Druglike molecules produced by gut bacteria can affect gut, immune health
 

Druglike molecules produced by gut bacteria can affect gut, immune health

Stanford researchers found that manipulating the gut microbe Clostridium sporogenes changed levels of molecules in the bloodstreams of mice and, in turn, affected their health.

 
Clinical trial points to new cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients
 

Clinical trial points to new cell therapy for relapsed leukemia patients

Instead of targeting a molecule called CD19 on the surface of the cancer cells, the new therapy targets a molecule called CD22.

 
Stem cells that generate fat tissue have circadian clock
 

Stem cells that generate fat tissue have circadian clock

New discoveries about the circadian-clock machinery in the precursors to fat cells may explain why shift workers are prone to metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, a Stanford study finds.

 
Drug for spinal muscular atrophy prompts ethical dilemmas
 

Drug for spinal muscular atrophy prompts ethical dilemmas

Medical experts at Stanford and their colleagues at several other universities have raised ethical questions about the way a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy is being used.

 
Second ‘don’t eat me’ signal found on cancer cells
 

Second ‘don’t eat me’ signal found on cancer cells

CD47 is an important inhibitor of cancer-killing immune cells called macrophages. Now Stanford researchers have identified another, similar way to activate macrophages to destroy cancer cells.

 
Study links common male medical condition to vascular disease
 

Study links common male medical condition to vascular disease

Harnessing the power of big data, Stanford researchers found that enlarged veins on the scrotum are linked with a higher risk of vascular and metabolic disease in men.

 
Stanford honors Miguel 'Mike' Alvarez with 2017 Marsh O’Neill Award

Stanford honors Miguel 'Mike' Alvarez with 2017 Marsh O’Neill Award

Mike Alvarez, the animal care supervisor in the Veterinary Service Center, received the 2017 Marsh O’Neill award. The award is one of the few opportunities for faculty to acknowledge publicly the support of outstanding staff members who support their research activity.

 

  

  


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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