Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
April 24, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 8
Study shows protein in human umbilical cord blood rejuvenates old mice’s impaired learning, memory

Study shows protein in human umbilical cord blood rejuvenates old mice’s impaired learning, memory

Umbilical cord blood from human newborns, and in particular a single protein contained in it, boosted old mice’s brain function and cognitive performance, new research from Stanford shows.

 
 
Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis, study finds
 

Wearable sweat sensor can diagnose cystic fibrosis, study finds

A wearable sensor developed by Stanford researchers can diagnose diseases by measuring molecular constituents of sweat, such as chloride ions and glucose.

 
Physicians’ misunderstanding of genetic test results may hamper mastectomy decisions for breast cancer patients
 

Physicians’ misunderstanding of genetic test results may hamper mastectomy decisions for breast cancer patients

Women with breast cancer do not receive timely genetic testing or have adequate access to effective genetic counseling, which may compromise treatment decisions, according to research from Stanford and the University of Michigan.

 
Fibrosis reversed when ‘don’t eat me’ signal blocked
 

Fibrosis reversed when ‘don’t eat me’ signal blocked

A common signaling pathway unites diverse fibrotic diseases in humans, Stanford researchers have found. An antibody called anti-CD47, which is being tested as an anti-cancer agent, reverses fibrosis in mice.

 
Suppressing single protein greatly extends life span of mice with ALS-like disease
 

Suppressing single protein greatly extends life span of mice with ALS-like disease

A set of experiments at Stanford reveals that suppressing a protein called ataxin 2 dramatically extends survival and improves motor function in a mouse model of ALS.

 
Protein primes mouse stem cells to quickly repair injury
 

Protein primes mouse stem cells to quickly repair injury

Pretreatment with a stem-cell-activating protein significantly enhances healing in mice, Stanford researchers say. The approach could eventually help people going into surgery or combat heal better from injuries they sustain.

 
Annual lab swap diverts unused supplies from landfill
 

Annual lab swap diverts unused supplies from landfill

More than 100 Stanford laboratories got rid of unneeded equipment and reagents, and also found stuff they could use, at the annual lab swap, part of Stanford’s Cardinal Green Labs program.

 
Picture imperfect
 

Picture imperfect

Children depict chronic pain…

 
Digital archive of antique wax figures becomes a teaching tool

Digital archive of antique wax figures becomes a teaching tool

A project to photograph anatomical wax figures made between the mid-17th and mid-19th centuries has yielded images now used in courses at Stanford.

 
5 Questions: Christopher Almond on pediatric heart pump trial

5 Questions: Christopher Almond on pediatric heart pump trial

Stanford is leading a multisite study of a new ventricular assist device for children who are awaiting heart transplantation. The miniature pump is slightly bigger than a paper clip.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Amin Aalipour, Teri Klein, KT Park and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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