Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
April 10, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 7
Study shows how slow breathing induces tranquility

Study shows how slow breathing induces tranquility

Stanford scientists have identified a small group of neurons that communicates goings-on in the brain’s respiratory control center to the structure responsible for generating arousal throughout the brain.

 
 
Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer
 

Monounsaturated fats help roundworms live longer

Roundworms storing monounsaturated fats in their guts live longer, according to Stanford researchers. Their study links epigenetic regulation with fat metabolism, and may have implications for many species.

 
Nerve cells actively repress alternative cell fates
 

Nerve cells actively repress alternative cell fates

A regulatory protein actively blocks the expression of non-neuronal genes in nerve cells, according to new Stanford research. The finding suggests there are many master regulators to help cell types maintain their identities.

 
Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans
 

Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans

A Stanford-led team of researchers has developed tiny bubbles that bind to malignant tumors, making them visible to ultrasound imaging.

 
Hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems for Type 1 diabetes come of age
 

Hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery systems for Type 1 diabetes come of age

Researchers at the School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital are testing easier ways for younger children with Type 1 diabetes to get the doses of insulin they need.

 
Brain’s navigation more complex than previously thought
 

Brain’s navigation more complex than previously thought

Neuroscientists’ discovery of grid cells, popularly known as the brain’s GPS, was hailed as a major discovery. But new Stanford research suggest the system is more complicated than anyone had guessed.

 
Autism researchers seek teens, young adults for drug trial
 

Autism researchers seek teens, young adults for drug trial

Scientists at Stanford are studying pregnenolone, a neurosteroid that may help treat irritability, sensory abnormalities and social deficits in adolescents with autism.

 
Random Acts of Flowers delivers encouragement to Stanford Hospital patients
 

Random Acts of Flowers delivers encouragement to Stanford Hospital patients

Volunteers assemble unused flowers from florists, grocery stores and flower markets into new bouquets, then hand deliver them to patients at Stanford Hospital and other Bay Area hospitals.

 
Special delivery: Students organize to send letters of support to Syrian refugees

Special delivery: Students organize to send letters of support to Syrian refugees

A group of Stanford medical students is helping organize a campaign to send letters to Syrian refugees living in Jordan.

 
$50 million gift to Packard Children’s Hospital will advance care, research of pediatric heart disease

$50 million gift to Packard Children’s Hospital will advance care, research of pediatric heart disease

The donation from philanthropists Gordon and Betty Moore is the largest gift to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford since the hospital’s founding gift.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Daniel Chang, Louanne Hudgins, Thomas Weiser and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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