Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Feb. 13, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 3
Scientists develop ‘lab on a chip’ that costs 1 cent to make

Scientists develop ‘lab on a chip’ that costs 1 cent to make

Microfluidics, electronics and inkjet technology underlie a newly developed all-in-one biochip from Stanford that can analyze cells for research and clinical applications.

 
 
Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice
 

Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice

Growing organs from one species in the body of another may one day relieve transplant shortages. Now researchers show that islets from rat-grown mouse pancreases can reverse disease when transplanted into diabetic mice.

 
Physicians fail to recommend genetic testing to many high-risk breast cancer patients
 

Physicians fail to recommend genetic testing to many high-risk breast cancer patients

Physicians often fail to recommend genetic testing to breast cancer patients at high risk for cancer-associated mutations. Improving access to genetic counseling about the testing process and results is a key priority.

 
Deep-learning algorithm matches dermatologists’ ability to identify skin cancer
 

Deep-learning algorithm matches dermatologists’ ability to identify skin cancer

In the hope of creating better access to medical care, Stanford researchers have trained an algorithm to diagnose skin cancer.

 
Brain mapping technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremors
 

Brain mapping technique reveals circuitry of Parkinson’s disease tremors

The new Stanford technique probes the neural pathways that cause these tremors, and also provides a way to map and troubleshoot other circuits in the brain.

 
15 School of Medicine researchers named CZ Biohub investigators
 

15 School of Medicine researchers named CZ Biohub investigators

The researchers will be given funding by the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub to develop tools and technologies that support the organization’s goal of curing, preventing or managing every disease.

 
5 Questions: Taia Wang on why some develop severe dengue disease
 

5 Questions: Taia Wang on why some develop severe dengue disease

A new study has found a specific immunologic response among people likely to get severe dengue disease. The work could help lead to a screening test for people at risk of getting a serious case of the disease and to targeted vaccines.

 
New chief operating officer begins at Stanford Health Care

New chief operating officer begins at Stanford Health Care

Quinn McKenna is responsible for overall operations of the health care system, reporting directly to president and CEO David Entwistle.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Steven Frick, Arden Morris and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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