Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Jan. 9, 2017
Vol. 9, No. 1
Blood test could provide cheaper, better way for doctors to manage lung cancer

Blood test could provide cheaper, better way for doctors to manage lung cancer

A technique developed at Stanford for detecting the genetic profiles of tumor cells sifted from the bloodstream could offer a valuable tool for the clinic and the lab.

 
 
Smartphones could be game-changing tool for cardiovascular research
 

Smartphones could be game-changing tool for cardiovascular research

Stanford researchers say that data collected through MyHeart Counts, a heart-health study in which participants transmit information through an app, demonstrates the potential of smartphones to transform the measurement of physical activity and fitness for clinical research.

 
Tech support at medical school gets ‘lean,’ raises the bar for service
 

Tech support at medical school gets ‘lean,’ raises the bar for service

Ever since the IRT Help Desk established a lean process improvement team, help-ticket response times and customer satisfaction have been steadily improving.

 
Research locates absence epilepsy seizure ‘choke point’ in brain
 

Research locates absence epilepsy seizure ‘choke point’ in brain

Stanford researchers used a rodent model to discover that shifting the firing pattern of a particular set of brain cells is all it takes to initiate, or to terminate, an absence seizure.

 
Some glioblastoma patients benefit from ‘ineffective’ treatment
 

Some glioblastoma patients benefit from ‘ineffective’ treatment

Glioblastoma patients with a high degree of vascularization of their tumors were found to have benefited from a treatment previously deemed ineffective, a new Stanford study shows.

 
Gene activity predicts progression of autoimmune disease
 

Gene activity predicts progression of autoimmune disease

Stanford researchers and their collaborators have found a way to tell whether patients with systemic sclerosis were improving during drug treatment a year before a standard clinical test could.

 
Starfish larvae create complex water whorls to eat and run
 

Starfish larvae create complex water whorls to eat and run

Tiny starfish larvae employ a complex and previously unknown survival mechanism involving whorls of water that either bring food to them or speed them away to better feeding grounds.

 
Therapy dogs take a bite out of student stress before exams

Therapy dogs take a bite out of student stress before exams

A friendly group of dogs visited campus to help relax medical students before exams.

 
5 Questions: Infectious disease researcher on bread-baking

5 Questions: Infectious disease researcher on bread-baking

Fiona Strouts began baking bread as a hobby. Now, she sells her homemade loaves at the Portola Valley Farmers Market.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Lacramioara Bintu, Thomas Robinson and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

You're receiving this newsletter because you registered with us. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe here.

Copyright © 2017 Stanford University