Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Nov. 21, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 21
High-intensity statins linked to better survival rates of cardiovascular patients

High-intensity statins linked to better survival rates of cardiovascular patients

In a retrospective study of a large population of patients with cardiovascular disease, Stanford researchers concluded that high-intensity statin treatments increased rates of survival.

 
 
Traumatic stress changes brains of boys, girls differently
 

Traumatic stress changes brains of boys, girls differently

A brain region that integrates emotions and actions appears to undergo accelerated maturation in adolescent girls with PTSD, but not in boys with the condition, a Stanford study has found.

 
Study finds people with Ebola may not always show symptoms
 

Study finds people with Ebola may not always show symptoms

A research team determined that 25 percent of individuals in a Sierra Leone village were infected with the Ebola virus but had no symptoms, suggesting broader transmission of the virus than originally thought.

 
DNA sequencing determines lymphoma origin, prognosis
 

DNA sequencing determines lymphoma origin, prognosis

Monitoring cancer DNA in blood can predict recurrence and prognosis and drive treatment decisions. A Stanford study of 92 lymphoma patients suggests similar techniques may work for other tumors.

 
More GABA in one brain region linked to better working memory
 

More GABA in one brain region linked to better working memory

The amount of a neurotransmitter called GABA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex predicted individuals’ ability to keep several things in mind simultaneously, researchers found.

 
5 Questions: Douglas Owens on new statin recommendation
 

5 Questions: Douglas Owens on new statin recommendation

The Stanford professor of medicine was a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, which has issued a new recommendation on statin use based on an extensive literature review.

 
New magnetic tool enables fewer incisions in gallbladder surgery
 

New magnetic tool enables fewer incisions in gallbladder surgery

By attaching a magnetic clip to the gallbladder and using another magnet to manipulate it from outside the body, surgeons can reduce the number of incisions needed to remove the organ.

 
Fall issue of Stanford Medicine looks at power, limits of diagnostics

Fall issue of Stanford Medicine looks at power, limits of diagnostics

Researchers in the field of diagnostics are taking advantage of advances in biomedical research, engineering and computer technology to make diagnostics more informative and less invasive.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Christopher Almond, Christina Curtis, Lidia Schapira, Eric Sun and and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

You're receiving this newsletter because you registered with us. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe here.

Copyright © 2017 Stanford University