Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Nov. 7, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 20
Researchers take step toward gene therapy for sickle cell disease

Researchers take step toward gene therapy for sickle cell disease

Using the CRISPR gene-editing technique in stem cells, Stanford researchers repaired the gene that causes sickle cell disease, and the mended stem cells were successfully transplanted into mice.

 
 
Gene therapy for blistering skin disease appears to enhance healing in clinical trial
 

Gene therapy for blistering skin disease appears to enhance healing in clinical trial

A trial in which genetically altered skin was grafted onto patients’ chronic wounds marks the first time that skin-based gene therapy has been demonstrated to be safe and effective in humans.

 
Researchers explore how physicians can handle discrimination by patients, families
 

Researchers explore how physicians can handle discrimination by patients, families

As part of a study, more than a dozen physicians were asked how they would advise their trainees to respond to three scenarios of discrimination, as well as how they would respond themselves.

 
5 Questions: Halpern-Felsher on teens’ misconceptions about marijuana
 

5 Questions: Halpern-Felsher on teens’ misconceptions about marijuana

A survey of hundreds of California high-school students shows that teens don’t understand the risks of marijuana use, and are more likely to smoke it if they have seen marijuana ads.

 
More than 15 million children in high-mortality hotspots in sub-Saharan Africa, researchers find
 

More than 15 million children in high-mortality hotspots in sub-Saharan Africa, researchers find

A new spatial analysis from Stanford shows that progress in combating child mortality has been highly uneven, even within countries where overall declines are substantial…

 
Hormone that controls maturation of fat cells discovered
 

Hormone that controls maturation of fat cells discovered

Mature fat cells produce a hormone that regulates the differentiation of nearby stem cells in response to glucocorticoid hormones and high-fat diets, Stanford researchers have found.

 
DNA damage response links short telomeres, heart disorder in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
 

DNA damage response links short telomeres, heart disorder in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

A new study shows that telomeres shorten without cell division in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Subsequent DNA damage responses and mitochondrial dysfunction are likely cause of heart failure.

 
Microballoons could reveal how the small intestine adapts to dietary load
 

Microballoons could reveal how the small intestine adapts to dietary load

A microballoon that fits inside a fruit fly intestine could help scientists understand the forces or nutrients responsible for signaling the intestine to grow or shrink in response to food.

 
City honors medical student for lifesaving CPR

City honors medical student for lifesaving CPR

A Stanford medical student was recently recognized for her lifesaving action in preforming CPR on a man who had gone into sudden cardiac arrest.

 
There will be blood

There will be blood

In the Rivals for Life blood drive, Stanford and Cal face off to see who can donate more pints.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about James Lock, Laura Simons, James Zou and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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