Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Sept. 12, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 16
In rite of passage, students meet cadavers

In rite of passage, students meet cadavers

Stanford's class of 93 first-year medical students meet their cadavers for the first time, a rite of passage on the journey to becoming physicians.

 
 
Retinoic acid suppresses colorectal cancer development
 

Retinoic acid suppresses colorectal cancer development

Levels of retinoic acid, a vitamin A metabolite, are low in mice and humans with colorectal cancer, according to new research. People with high levels of an enzyme that degrades retinoic acid have a poor prognosis.

 
Investigators identify brain circuit that drives sleep-wake states
 

Investigators identify brain circuit that drives sleep-wake states

Inhibiting the firing of nerve cells in a brain area long known to guide goal-directed behavior makes mice build nests and fall asleep, a new study shows. Stimulating the circuit roused the mice and kept them awake.

 
More chemo drugs don’t improve treatment of rare bone cancer
 

More chemo drugs don’t improve treatment of rare bone cancer

Osteosarcoma patients with tumors that haven’t responded well to the standard chemotherapy regimen have unimproved outcomes and more side effects when given two additional drugs, a large international trial has found.

 
Physician advice to patients on e-cigarettes varies, reveals knowledge gaps
 

Physician advice to patients on e-cigarettes varies, reveals knowledge gaps

Researchers analyzed an online medical forum to better understand what patients want to know about e-cigarettes and how doctors respond to those questions.

 
Egyptian women say doctors don’t discourage female genital cutting
 

Egyptian women say doctors don’t discourage female genital cutting

More Egyptian women are seeking the opinions of physicians on whether their daughters should undergo female genital cutting, which is illegal in the country, but they say doctors don’t advise against the procedure.

 
Common molecular mechanism of Parkinson’s pathology discovered in study
 

Common molecular mechanism of Parkinson’s pathology discovered in study

Intracellular defects that lead to cells’ failure to decommission faulty “power packs” known as mitochondria cause nerve cells to die, triggering the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

 
Stanford’s Wellness Living Laboratory to explore wellness in U.S., China, Taiwan

Stanford’s Wellness Living Laboratory to explore wellness in U.S., China, Taiwan

An international clinical research project that Stanford launched on Sept. 12 aims to find out how to enhance health and overall wellness.

 
Stanford’s lab for cell, gene medicine opens in Palo Alto

Stanford’s lab for cell, gene medicine opens in Palo Alto

Making cell- or virus-based therapies for use in humans requires a rigid set of quality-control standards outlined by the Food and Drug Administration. A new Stanford facility will allow promising new therapies to be tested in the clinic.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about James Chen, Denise Monack, Anand Veeravagu and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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