Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
April 11, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 7
After rare procedure, woman can hear her heart beat in another

After rare procedure, woman can hear her heart beat in another

Stanford Medicine surgeons performed an unusual transplantation in which one woman received a heart-lung transplant, while her existing heart was given to another patient.

 
 
Phase-3 trial of drug for refractory rheumatoid arthritis successful
 

Phase-3 trial of drug for refractory rheumatoid arthritis successful

A new drug appears to help people who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, but eventually stop benefitting from the use of the current top treatment: injectable, bioengineered proteins that interfere with the action of a powerful inflammatory substance.

 
Smokers have harder time getting jobs, study finds
 

Smokers have harder time getting jobs, study finds

A study comparing employment in smokers and nonsmokers showed that by 12 months, smokers were less likely to have found a job than nonsmokers, and those who did earned less than nonsmokers.

 
Y chromosome genes from Neanderthals likely extinct in modern men
 

Y chromosome genes from Neanderthals likely extinct in modern men

The Neanderthal counterpart of the human Y chromosome, or male sex chromosome, appears to have died out. Why this happened is up for debate.

 
Magnet-powered bone-lengthening device reduces pain, infection risk
 

Magnet-powered bone-lengthening device reduces pain, infection risk

Andrew Hirsch, 18, who had more than an inch added to his femur, knows from experience the benefits of a new bone-lengthening device.

 
Changes in human reproduction raise legal, ethical issues
 

Changes in human reproduction raise legal, ethical issues

The implications of emerging biotechnologies and what they mean for human reproduction and making babies raises legal, ethical and social issues, according to law professor Hank Greely.

 
Resurrected drug effective against two human viruses in a lab dish
 

Resurrected drug effective against two human viruses in a lab dish

Stanford scientists found that a discarded drug helps human cells in a lab dish fight off two different viruses. Based on what they learned about how the drug works, it might also help fight the viruses that cause Ebola, dengue and Zika, among others.

 
Tracking pain: Health data provided by patients adds up to better care
 

Tracking pain: Health data provided by patients adds up to better care

Sean Mackey and his colleagues created a computer-based system that uses streams of data from many patients to help physicians provide the best care for individuals.

 
Paper tape can help prevent foot blisters

Paper tape can help prevent foot blisters

Researchers followed ultramarathon runners around the world to test whether low-cost paper tape could reduce debilitating and painful blisters.

 
Plastic surgeon Lars Vistnes, a founding director of Interplast, dies at 88

Plastic surgeon Lars Vistnes, a founding director of Interplast, dies at 88

The specialist in oculoplastic surgery performed reconstructive procedures in the developing world and mentored new faculty.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Charlotte Jacobs, Nicholas Leeper, Megan Troxell and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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