Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Feb. 22, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 4
Innovative oxygen therapy helps to save unborn baby with deadly heart defect

Innovative oxygen therapy helps to save unborn baby with deadly heart defect

Prenatal oxygen treatment plus fast and aggressive action after birth helped a San Jose baby born at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford survive until he could undergo surgical repair of his heart at 11 days old.

 
 
Blood test could transform tuberculosis diagnosis, help monitor treatment effectiveness
 

Blood test could transform tuberculosis diagnosis, help monitor treatment effectiveness

A simple blood test that can accurately diagnose active tuberculosis could make it easier and cheaper to control a disease that kills 1.5 million people every year.

 
Study finds possible new jet-lag treatment: Exposure to flashing light
 

Study finds possible new jet-lag treatment: Exposure to flashing light

Short flashes of light at night are more effective than using continuous light as therapy to prevent disruptions in people’s circadian rhythms, according to researchers.

 
Researchers create compound that combats drug-resistant malaria parasites, spares human cells
 

Researchers create compound that combats drug-resistant malaria parasites, spares human cells

Teasing apart subtle differences between a protein-shredding structure found in malaria parasites and in human cells enabled researchers to design a compound targeting the parasite without harming human tissue.

 
Researchers discover previously unknown bacterial species in dolphins
 

Researchers discover previously unknown bacterial species in dolphins

The findings could help scientists detect potential health problems facing marine mammals due to climate change, as well as answer a mystery about how dolphins digest whole fish.

 
Researchers find marker identifying most basic form of blood stem cell
 

Researchers find marker identifying most basic form of blood stem cell

Nearly 30 years after the discovery of the hematopoietic stem cell, Stanford researchers have found a marker that allows them to study the version of these stem cells that continues to replicate.

 
Journal publishes paper by video-gamers who derived scientific rules from Stanford online RNA game
 

Journal publishes paper by video-gamers who derived scientific rules from Stanford online RNA game

Video-gamers have co-authored a paper describing a new set of rules for determining the difficulty of designing structures composed of RNA molecules.

 
New chair of pathology named at Stanford Medicine
 

New chair of pathology named at Stanford Medicine

Thomas Montine, a neuropathologist, is a national expert in the study of the molecular and structural causes of cognitive decline in aging. He comes to Stanford from the University of Washington.

 
Stanford Medicine magazine reports on precision health

Stanford Medicine magazine reports on precision health

The winter issue of the magazine details work at Stanford advancing precision health. Also included is a Q&A with Tom Brokaw and an excerpt from neurosurgeon Paul Kalanithi’s best-selling memoir When Breath Becomes Air.

 
5 Questions: Frank Longo on Alzheimer's, new neuroscience center

5 Questions: Frank Longo on Alzheimer's, new neuroscience center

In a recent interview, neurologist Frank Longo discussed Alzheimer’s disease, recent research breakthroughs and the new Stanford Neuroscience Health Center, which he co-leads.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Timothy Durazzo, Kim Rhoads, Brendan Visser and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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