Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Feb. 8, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 3
In rebuilding noses, age-old practice lives on

In rebuilding noses, age-old practice lives on

Sam Most has rebuilt nearly 1,000 severely damaged or destroyed noses over the past 15 years, in many cases using the "forehead flap," a surgical technique that originated long ago in India.

 
 
Child life program helps hospitalized children handle stress, have fun
 

Child life program helps hospitalized children handle stress, have fun

Child life specialists help young patients understand medical procedures, deal with fears and even play and have fun in the hospital.

 
Wearable device detects, analyzes real-time changes in chemical composition of sweat
 

Wearable device detects, analyzes real-time changes in chemical composition of sweat

Complementary electronic technologies underlie a newly developed, wearable sensor that can help monitor what is happening inside the body.

 
Individuals' medical histories predicted by their noncoding genomes
 

Individuals' medical histories predicted by their noncoding genomes

Researchers have found that analyzing mutations in regions of the genome that control genes can predict medical conditions such as hypertension, narcolepsy and heart problems.

 
Fast, accurate cystic fibrosis test developed at Stanford
 

Fast, accurate cystic fibrosis test developed at Stanford

The new technique will allow for more comprehensive newborn screening, while also cutting the time and cost needed for testing.

 
Oleg Jardetzky, pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, dies at 86
 

Oleg Jardetzky, pioneer in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, dies at 86

The imaging expert founded two of the world’s first laboratories dedicated to using nuclear magnetic resonance to study biological molecules.

 
Herbert Abrams, pioneering radiologist and anti-nuclear activist, dies at 95
 

Herbert Abrams, pioneering radiologist and anti-nuclear activist, dies at 95

Abrams’ multi-faceted career embraced patient care, teaching and medical research as well as a passionate advocacy for world peace.

 
Small number of physicians linked to many malpractice claims

Small number of physicians linked to many malpractice claims

A small group of physicians accounts for a substantial share of all claims, and an ability to reliably identify those physicians at an early stage could guide efforts to improve heath care, according to a new study.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Tara Chang, Robert Ohgami, Fan Yang and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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