Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Jan. 11, 2016
Vol. 8, No. 1
New microscopy technique maps mechanical properties of living cells

New microscopy technique maps mechanical properties of living cells

Researchers have developed a new way to use atomic force microscopy to rapidly measure the mechanical properties of cells, an advance that could pave the way for better understanding immune disorders and cancer.

 
 
Stroke recovery in mice improved by Ambien
 

Stroke recovery in mice improved by Ambien

Zolpidem, better known by the trade name Ambien, increased the rate at which mice that had strokes recovered their pre-stroke sensory acuity and motor coordination.

 
Viral infections leave a signature on human immune system
 

Viral infections leave a signature on human immune system

A test that queries the body’s own cells can distinguish a viral infection from a bacterial infection and could help doctors know when to use antibiotics.

 
Tweak in gene expression may have helped humans walk upright
 

Tweak in gene expression may have helped humans walk upright

A study of the tiny stickleback fish led to the identification of a genomic region possibly linked to modifications in human toes and feet that enable upright walking.

 
Overprescribing of opioids is not limited to a few bad apples
 

Overprescribing of opioids is not limited to a few bad apples

Researchers find that prescribing of opioids — such as morphine, oxycodone and hydrocodone — is widespread for the Medicare population.

 
Scientists, engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution
 

Scientists, engineers invent process to accelerate protein evolution

A new tool enables researchers to test millions of mutated proteins in a matter of hours or days. The technology could speed the search for new medicines, industrial enzymes and biosensors.

 
Stunning diversity of gut bacteria uncovered by new approach to gene sequencing devised at Stanford
 

Stunning diversity of gut bacteria uncovered by new approach to gene sequencing devised at Stanford

The many microbes living in our intestines are far more diverse than once suspected, a new genomic technique reveals.

 
Interactions between attention-grabbing brain networks weak in ADHD
 

Interactions between attention-grabbing brain networks weak in ADHD

The neural circuits that help us pay attention and stop daydreaming exert less influence on brain activity in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder than in other kids.

 
Stanford scientist Stanley Falkow to receive National Medal of Science

Stanford scientist Stanley Falkow to receive National Medal of Science

The microbiologist conducted pioneering work in learning how bacteria can cause human disease and how antibiotic resistance spreads.

 
Toenail trim saves lab mice from common, life-threatening skin condition

Toenail trim saves lab mice from common, life-threatening skin condition

A new Stanford-developed technique helps preserve valuable research mice from a condition that is the most common, preventable reason for euthanasia.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Michele Berk, Anne Muehe, Joseph Wu and others.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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