Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Oct. 26, 2015
Vol. 7, No. 19
Green Button: The promise of personalizing medical practice guidelines in real time

Green Button: The promise of personalizing medical practice guidelines in real time

For most patients, treatment guidelines are fuzzy at best and, at worst, nonexistent, forcing clinicians to rely on educated guesswork. But thanks to advances in computation, data processing and telecommunication, that may be about to change.

 
 
Sleep deprivation affects stem cells, reducing transplant efficiency
 

Sleep deprivation affects stem cells, reducing transplant efficiency

Although the research was done in mice, the findings have possible implications for bone marrow transplants, more properly called hematopoietic stem cell transplants, in humans.

 
Chinese, American experts explore precision health, big data at symposium
 

Chinese, American experts explore precision health, big data at symposium

More than 300 health researchers from China and the United States convened at Stanford to share their knowledge of precision health, mobile health devices, population health, genomics and cancer.

 
From bedside to patient: An Ebola survivor's odyssey
 

From bedside to patient: An Ebola survivor's odyssey

Ian Crozier, MD, a physician volunteer in West Africa, recounted his story of surviving the Ebola virus and the complications that ensued.

 
Faculty panel considers promises, challenges of precision health
 

Faculty panel considers promises, challenges of precision health

At a Stanford Medicine Town Hall, three faculty members explored prospects for precision health — health care whose goal is to anticipate and prevent disease in the healthy and precisely diagnose and treat disease in the ill.

 
Cancer nanotechnology center to receive more than $9 million
 

Cancer nanotechnology center to receive more than $9 million

The five-year grant is the third award from the National Cancer Institute to fund the Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence in Translational Diagnostics at Stanford.

 
Precursor cells discovered that could help regrow heart arteries
 

Precursor cells discovered that could help regrow heart arteries

Researchers discovered, in mice, the direct progenitors to coronary artery smooth muscle cells, the important component that encases the artery and gives it strength.

 
Who's hungry? You can't tell by looking, pediatricians say
 

Who's hungry? You can't tell by looking, pediatricians say

During the 2010 recession, pediatrician Lisa Chamberlain learned that 50 to 60 percent of families seen at the Ravenswood Family Health Center were struggling to pay rent and buy food.

 
Why a 61-year-old went to children's hospital for heart surgery

Why a 61-year-old went to children's hospital for heart surgery

Most adults who had congenital heart defects repaired when they were young are not cured, doctors have learned.

 
Anne Crowe, assistant director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, dies at 48

Anne Crowe, assistant director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, dies at 48

The 2014 Spirit Award winner oversaw finance, grant administration, human resources and facilities for the center.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about EKatherine Burke, Sergiu Pasca, Leanne Williams and more.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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