Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
July 13, 2015
Vol. 7, No. 13
Stanford Cancer Center South Bay opens to first patients

Stanford Cancer Center South Bay opens to first patients

A patient and family advisory council recommended ways to maximize patient comfort at the new cancer center.

 
 
Kennewick Man closely related to Native Americans
 

Kennewick Man closely related to Native Americans

The 8,500-year-old skeleton found in Washington, in 1996, has been the subject of a dispute. Now, genetic analyses of the ancient DNA suggest he is an ancestor of present-day Native Americans.

 
Adolescents uncertain about risks of marijuana, e-cigarettes
 

Adolescents uncertain about risks of marijuana, e-cigarettes

Adolescents get clear messages about the harms of smoking cigarettes, but they receive conflicting or sparse information about marijuana and e-cigarettes, a study finds.

 
Immune response to a flu protein yields new insights into narcolepsy
 

Immune response to a flu protein yields new insights into narcolepsy

A swine flu vaccine may have caused rare cases of narcolepsy by stimulating antibodies to attack brain cells that help regulate sleep.

 
Cystic fibrosis deadlier for Hispanic than non-Hispanic patients
 

Cystic fibrosis deadlier for Hispanic than non-Hispanic patients

In California, Hispanic patients with cystic fibrosis were three times as likely to die from the disease as their non-Hispanic counterparts, despite similar access to specialty care, a new study shows.

 
Out-of-pocket health costs tied to antimicrobial resistance
 

Out-of-pocket health costs tied to antimicrobial resistance

The increasing resistance to antimicrobial drugs is a growing public health concern, particularly in low- and middle-income countries that require high out-of-pocket payments for prescription drugs.

 
Research sheds light on how neurons control muscle movement
 

Research sheds light on how neurons control muscle movement

New research involving people diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease sheds light on how individual neurons control muscle movement in humans — and could help in the development of better brain-controlled prosthetic devices.

 
Study: Important to consider cause of kidney failure when planning future treatment
 

Study: Important to consider cause of kidney failure when planning future treatment

Most patients with failing kidneys face generic treatment paths. Outcomes may improve if their course of treatment is based on the root causes of their kidney failure, a new study says.

 
Stanford Medicine magazine shows some skin — and all its complexity

Stanford Medicine magazine shows some skin — and all its complexity

The summer issue goes deep on the most superficial part of the body: skin. Also included is an excerpt from a new biography of polio-vaccine pioneer Jonas Salk and an article on the growing number of castoff donor hearts.

 
5 Questions: James Lock on guidelines for treating teens’ eating disorders

5 Questions: James Lock on guidelines for treating teens’ eating disorders

James Lock, co-author of the first set of guidelines for treating adolescents with eating disorders, discusses why evidence-based therapies for these common and serious conditions are so important.

 
'A mother hen,' early Stanford kidney donor dies at 99

'A mother hen,' early Stanford kidney donor dies at 99

One of Stanford’s first living kidney donors lived a long and fulfilling life with her family.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. Read more


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

You're receiving this newsletter because you registered with us. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe here.

Copyright © 2017 Stanford University