Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Sept. 28, 2015
Vol. 7, No. 17
Drug prevents Type 1 diabetes in mice

Drug prevents Type 1 diabetes in mice

A compound that blocks the synthesis of hyaluronan, a substance generally found in in all body tissue, protected mice from getting Type 1 diabetes. The compound is already approved in Europe and Asia for the treatment of gallbladder disease.

 
 
Drug disarms deadly C. difficile bacteria without destroying healthy gut flora
 

Drug disarms deadly C. difficile bacteria without destroying healthy gut flora

A drug that blocks the intestinal pathogen without killing resident, beneficial microbes may prove superior to antibiotics, currently the front-line treatment for the infection.

 
Filtered sunlight a safe, low-tech treatment for newborn jaundice
 

Filtered sunlight a safe, low-tech treatment for newborn jaundice

Safe sunlight exposure under canopies that remove harmful rays is a low-cost, effective way to give phototherapy to jaundiced infants in impoverished settings, according to a new study.

 
Large-scale treatment of parasitic-worm disease cost-effective, Stanford-led study shows
 

Large-scale treatment of parasitic-worm disease cost-effective, Stanford-led study shows

Researchers are urging WHO to recommend broader and more frequent treatment of parasitic-worm diseases, which affect 1.5 billion people worldwide.

 
Combination drug therapy shrinks pancreatic tumors in mice
 

Combination drug therapy shrinks pancreatic tumors in mice

When used together, two drugs that affect the structure and function of DNA blocked the growth of pancreatic tumor cells in mice. Researchers hope the drugs can soon be tested in humans with pancreatic cancer.

 
5 Questions: Euan Ashley on diagnosing the undiagnosable
 

5 Questions: Euan Ashley on diagnosing the undiagnosable

A national program to diagnose difficult-to-diagnose patients is taking root at Stanford under the guidance of heart specialist Euan Ashley.

 
Delivering missing protein heals damaged hearts in animals, Stanford-led study finds
 

Delivering missing protein heals damaged hearts in animals, Stanford-led study finds

Researchers have discovered that a particular protein, Fstl1, plays a key role in regenerating dead heart-muscle cells.

 
For teens with bulimia, family-based therapy works best
 

For teens with bulimia, family-based therapy works best

Recovery from the eating disorder is faster if adolescents receive a treatment that enlists their parents, according to a new study.

 
Early-career awards fast track studies on poverty and health

Early-career awards fast track studies on poverty and health

Juggling her duties as a clinician and an instructor in family medicine, Rita Hamad is closer than ever to her goal of a research career, with the help of an early-career program and pilot grants.

 
Amir Rubin to step down from SHC at year's end

Amir Rubin to step down from SHC at year's end

During his five-year tenure, the hospital CEO has launched the construction of the new Stanford Hospital and an expansion of the organization’s primary-care and outpatient networks.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Victor Carrion, Frank Longo, Kuldev Singh and more.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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