Inside Stanford Medicine View web version
Aug. 24, 2015
Vol. 7, No. 15
Researchers genetically engineer yeast to produce opioids

Researchers genetically engineer yeast to produce opioids

It typically takes a year to produce hydrocodone from plants, but researchers have genetically modified yeast to make it in just a few days. The technique could improve access to medicines in impoverished nations.

 
 
Bacterial community in pregnant women linked to preterm birth, study finds
 

Bacterial community in pregnant women linked to preterm birth, study finds

A specific pattern of high bacterial diversity in the vagina during pregnancy increases a woman’s risk of giving birth prematurely, a new study finds.

 
Unique genes in Khoe-San people may lower risk of some pregnancy hazards
 

Unique genes in Khoe-San people may lower risk of some pregnancy hazards

An unusual mutation in an immune system gene switches a receptor from one target molecule to another. It’s the first known example of such a change, say Stanford researchers, and likely leads to safer pregnancies.

 
Brain scans better forecast math learning in kids than do skill tests, study finds
 

Brain scans better forecast math learning in kids than do skill tests, study finds

Gray matter volume and connections between several brain regions better forecast 8-year-olds’ acquisition of math skills than their performance on standard math tests.

 
Researchers design cheaper, faster, more accurate test to identify gene defects in heart patients
 

Researchers design cheaper, faster, more accurate test to identify gene defects in heart patients

A new technique could eventually enable doctors to diagnose genetic heart diseases by rapidly scanning more than 85 genes known to cause cardiac anomalies.

 
Researchers find mutations that contribute to rare blood cancer
 

Researchers find mutations that contribute to rare blood cancer

Mutations in immune cells prevented their natural death in roughly half of the cell samples from patients with the incurable cancer, and suggest drug targets for the disease.

 
X-ray laser experiment could help in designing drugs for brain disorders
 

X-ray laser experiment could help in designing drugs for brain disorders

Scientists found that when two protein structures in the brain join up, they act as an amplifier for a slight increase in calcium concentration, triggering a gunshot-like release of neurotransmitters from one neuron to another.

 
Scientists say e-cigarettes could have health impacts in developing world
 

Scientists say e-cigarettes could have health impacts in developing world

Two researchers are urging greater regulatory oversight of e-cigarettes in poorer countries, where sales of the devices are growing.

 
5 Questions: Charlotte Jacobs on biography and medicine

5 Questions: Charlotte Jacobs on biography and medicine

The retired Stanford professor’s most recent book, a biography of the polio-vaccine pioneer Jonas Salk, was published in the spring.

 
Finding usable medical images made easier through software

Finding usable medical images made easier through software

Lane Medical Library has developed a search tool that finds medical images on the Web and groups them based on how broad or restrictive their reuse rights are.

 

  

  

Of note

A roundup of recent honors and awards. In this issue, read about Ramin Dubey, Jennifer Tremmel, Michael Zeineh and more.


Inside Stanford Medicine is a twice-monthly newspaper that reports on the accomplishments and activities of the faculty, staff and students in the Stanford Medicine community. To suggest a story or to get more information, contact editor John Sanford at (650) 723-8309 or jsanford@stanford.edu.

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