Comparative Medicine

Faculty

Megan Albertelli, DVM, PhD Assistant Professor, received her D.V.M. from Michigan State University. She completed her residency training in laboratory animal medicine and her Ph.D. in Human Genetics at the University of Michigan. Dr. Albertelli joined the Stanford Department of Comparative Medicine in 2009. Her research interests include genetic variation in breast and prostate cancers, as well as the development and refinement of mouse models of cancer and celiac disease. Dr. Albertelli is a Diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine.
(650)725-3603/

Donna Bouley, DVM, PhD Professor, received her D.V.M. from the University of Tennessee and received her Ph.D. in 1995 in Comparative and Experimental Medicine (University of Tennessee) studying the immunopathology of Herpetic Stromal Keratitis in mouse models. She served on the faculty at Texas A&M for two years. She joined the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford in 1997 and currently directs the necropsy service for the VSC. Her research interests include phenotypic characterization of transgenic mice, and collaborative research with numerous investigators of various disciplines. Dr. Bouley is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Dr. Bouley founded and mentors the Stanford Undergraduate Pre-vet Club (SUPVC).
(650) 498-5403/

Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD Professor, received his D.V.M. from the University of California at Davis and his Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington. His laboratory uses electrophysiological and anatomical techniques to evaluate neuronal circuitry of temporal lobe structures in normal and epileptic brains.
(650)498-4774/

Linda Cork, DVM, PhD Professor Emerita

Corinna Darian-Smith, PhD Associate Professor, received her Ph.D. from the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Her Postdoctoral research was undertaken in the Department of Neurobiology at Rockefeller University. She is primarily interested in questions relating to (1) the organization of central neural pathways involved in fine finger/hand control, and (2) the capacity of these sensorimotor pathways to compensate/adapt following localized injury.
(650) 736-0969/

Stephen Felt, DVM, MPH Assistant Professor, received his D.V.M. from the University of Wisconsin and his M.P.H. from the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS). He completed his laboratory animal medicine residency training at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR). Dr Felt is a Diplomate of both the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Prior to arriving at Stanford, Dr. Felt served as the Director for the Animal Resources Program at the Naval Medical Research Unit No. 3 in Cairo, Egypt. His research interests include infectious diseases, particularly zoonoses, and exploring techniques which promote the health and welfare of laboratory animals
(650) 723-5305/

Joseph Garner, D.Phil., Associate Professor, received his doctoral degree from the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford, Great Britain, where he studied the developmental neuroethology of stereotypies in captive animals (1995-1999). His postdoctoral research in animal behavior and well-being was undertaken at UC Davis (1999-2004). He served as an Assistant (2004-2010) and an Associate (2010-2011) Professor of animal behavior and well-being in the Department of Animal Sciences at Purdue University, where he also held a courtesy appointment in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences (2009-2011). Dr. Garner joined the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford in 2011. Dr. Garner’s research interests include the development of refined methods in behavioral research; abnormal behaviors in animals (including barbering and ulcerative dermatitis) and their relationships with abnormal behaviors in humans; mouse well-being and enrichment; and the scientific impact of well-being problems in lab animals. Dr. Garner serves, or has served, as a council member for the International Society for Applied Ethology, an Editor for Applied Animal Behavior Science, a Special Topics section editor for the Journal of Animal Science, on the AAALAC Board of Trustees, on the SCAW Board of Trustees and on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Trichotillomania Learning Center.
(650) 725-5850/

Sherril Green, DVM, PhD Professor and Department Chair, Dr. Green received her D.V.M. from Louisiana State University and completed an internship in Equine Medicine and Surgery at the University of Missouri, and aresidency in Large Animal Medicine at the University of Florida. Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford, she was a clinical instructor in Large Animal Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, and subsequently completed a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Green is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.
(650) 723-6113/

Shaul Hestrin, PhD Professor, received his Ph.D. degree in Physiology from University of California, Los Angeles. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Hestrin held faculty appointments at University of California, San Francisco and University of Tennessee, Memphis.
(650) 498-5086/

Jennifer L. Johns DVM, PhD, Assistant Professor, received her D.V.M. from the University of California at Davis. After several years in veterinary practice, Dr. Johns returned to the University of California at Davis to complete residency training in clinical pathology, becoming a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 2007. Dr. Johns continued at the University of California at Davis to earn a Ph.D. in Comparative Pathology. Dr. Johns joined the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine in 2011.
(650) 721-6468

Claude M. Nagamine, DVM, PhD Assistant Professor received his D.V.M. from the University of Tennessee in 2004 and completed his residency training in Laboratory Animal Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007. He joined the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford in 2008. Prior to entering veterinary school, Dr. Nagamine obtained a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis (1979), obtained postdoctoral training in endocrinology, developmental genetics, immunology, and molecular biology of the mouse at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (NYC), Institut Pasteur (France), and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California, San Francisco and was an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. His research interests include the molecular genetics of mammalian sex determination and the effects of the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter hepaticus on mouse models of colon cancer.
(650) 498-4773/

Cholawat Pacharinsak, DVM, PhD Assistant Professor and Director of Anesthesia, Pain Management, at Stanford University’s Department of Comparative Medicine; he is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists (Dipl. ACVA). He received his DVM from Chulalongkorn University, Thailand and trained in an Anesthesiology/Pain Management residency program and received his Master's degree at Washington State University.  He completed his PhD in Pain Neuroscience from the University of Minnesota.   Prior to arriving at Stanford, Dr. Pacharinsak was a faculty member in Anesthesiology and Pain Management at Michigan State University and Purdue University; and served as a Clinical Specialist at UCLA.  
(650) 724-9832/

Mehrdad Shamloo, PhD By Courtesty Appointment, Associate Professor (Research) received his Ph.D. in Medical Science at the University of Lund, Sweden (Wallenberg Neuroscience Research Center). Dr. Shamloo joined the Stanford Departments of Neurosurgery and  Comparative Medicine in 2012 after tenure in the biotech and pharmaceutical industry . His research interests include the pathological process underlying malfunction of the nervous system following injury and neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and autism, as well as novel therapeutic approaches that improve the quality of life for patients with disorders of the brain. Dr. Shamloo is the Director of the Behavioral and Functional Neuroscience Laboratory of the Stanford Institute for Neuro-Innovation and Translational Neurosciences (SINTN).  He was also Program Director of the Institute for Neuro-Innovation & Translational Neuroscience from 2008 -2013.
(650) 725-3152/

 

 

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