Autumn Courses in Comparative Medicine AY 2017 - 2018

COMPMED 80N: Animal behavior: sex, death, and sometimes food!

Freshman preference seminar
3 Units | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grade option: Letter or Credit/No Credit                           Check out our All Quarters Courses too!

Instructor: Joseph Garner, DPhil
Location/days/time
:  Edwards R358 | Thurs | 11:30 -1:20
September 25 to December 8, 2017

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.

Joseph Garner, DPhil is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He received his doctoral degree in (abnormal) animal behavior at the University of Oxford, Great Britain, conducted his postdoctoral training at UC Davis, and began his faculty career at Purdue University. His research interests include the development of refined methods in behavioral research; abnormal behaviors in animals and their relationships with abnormal behaviors in humans; mouse well-being and enrichment; and the scientific impact of well-being problems in lab animals.

His favorite experiments are ones where the animals tell you what's really going on by doing the opposite of what was predicted. He became interested in animal behavior because of its potential to open a window into the experience of the animals that share our world and our lives. He pursued a career in the field because it presents some of the hardest questions and most beautiful answers in science; and because of the great potential for animal behavior to improve both the lives of animals, and also the lives of humans. He serves on the boards of both animal well-being and human mental health advocacy organizations. None of the animal members of his own family are particularly well behaved, but he prefers them that way.

For enrollment information go to Undergrad Introductory Seminar's site

COMPMED 87Q The Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Sophomore preference seminar
3 Units | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit                  Check out our All Quarters Courses too!

Instructor: Claude Nagamine, DVM, PhD, DACLAM
Location/days/time: Edwards Building, R358 | Wedns 2:30 -3:20
                                             RAF 2, AR004 | Fri 1:30 - 3:20
September 25 to December 08, 2017

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, introduction to anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Claude Nagamine, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, Associate Professor, received his Ph.D. in Ecology at the University of California, Davis in 1979 and his D.V.M. at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 2004. Prior to entering veterinary school he was an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in Laboratory Animal Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007 and became board certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine in 2008. His research interests include mouse models of dengue virus, the molecular genetics of mammalian sex determination, and mouse infectious diseases. He joined the Stanford faculty in 2008 and is Director of Rodent Services and the Rodent Health Surveillance Program.

To enroll visit the Undergrad Introductory Seminar's site

COMPMED 107: Comparative Brain Evolution (COMPMED 207)

Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

Instructors: Buckmaster, P. (PI) ; Darian-Smith, C. (PI)                                                                     Check out our All Quarters Courses too!
Location, Days, Time:  CCSR 4205 |  Tues, Thurs 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
September 25 - December 15, 2017

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi. Evolution of the primate visual and sensorimotor central nervous system as related to vocalization, socialization, and intelligence.

Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD Professor, received his D.V.M. from the University of California at Davis and his Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington. His laboratory uses electrophysiological and anatomical techniques to evaluate neuronal circuitry of temporal lobe structures.

For enrollment information go to Stanford University Registrar's site.

COMPMED 202: Training in Research and Biomethodology for Laboratory Animal Science

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)                                                  Check out our All - Quarter Courses too!
Instructors: Pacharinsak, C. (PI)
Location, Days, Time:  Online and in-person | Fri, 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM
September 25 - December 08, 2017

Emphasis is on providing introductory training and practical, hands-on workshops for students interested in learning more about research biomethodology and animal models of human and animal disease. Topics include basic care and principals guiding the use of research animals, animal health and welfare, and research animal enrichment, basic mouse handling, rodent breeding, and the principals of rodent surgery and anesthesia. Content delivered online and in-person.

Cholawat Pacharinsak, DVM, PhD is a veterinary anesthesiologist, an assistant professor, and the director of Anesthesia, Pain Management, and Surgery in the Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine. He has a PhD in pain neuroscience, and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists (DACVA). His research interests include understanding the neurobiology of cancer pain and acute pain models using behavioral and electrophysiological techniques. He also focuses on how to control pain effectively in a clinical setting.

For enrollment information contact Cholawat Pacharinsak, DVM, PhD

COMPMED 207: Comparative Brain Evolution (COMPMED 107)

Units: 4 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Buckmaster, P. (PI) ; Darian-Smith, C. (PI)                                                                        Check out our All Quarters Courses too!
Location, Days, Time:  CCSR 4205 |  Tues, Thurs 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
September 25 - December 15, 2017

Functional organization and evolution of the vertebrate nervous system. Topics include paleoneurology, cladistic analysis, allometry, mosaic versus concerted evolution, and evolution of brain region structure, connectivity, and neurons. Comparisons between structure and function of vertebrate forebrains including hippocampi. Evolution of the primate visual and sensorimotor central nervous system as related to vocalization, socialization, and intelligence.

Paul Buckmaster, DVM, PhD Professor, received his D.V.M. from the University of California at Davis and his Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Washington. His laboratory uses electrophysiological and anatomical techniques to evaluate neuronal circuitry of temporal lobe structures.

For enrollment information go to Stanford University Registrar's site

COMPMED 211: Biostatistics for the Life Sciences: Best practices for reproducibility and translation

Units: 2 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructor:  Joseph Garner, DPhil
Location, Days, Time
Li Ka Shing Center 304/305, Thu   3:00 PM - 4:50 PM  
09/25/2017 - 12/08/2017

Preference to students in the MLAS program. Interested students should contact the Comparative Medicine Department to enroll. Emphasis is on real-world experimental design and analysis in the life sciences, with particular focus on modern techniques that maximize power and minimize sample size, and avoiding common errors contributing to false discovery and the reproducibility crisis. This is flipped-classroom. Class time is devoted to discussion of assigned reading (primarily Grafen & Hails 2002 "Modern statistics for the life sciences"), criticism of papers, working through example data sets, and developing analyses for the students' own data. The course studiously avoids the use of equations to explain anything. Enrollment is limited to MLAS students, unless student has course director consent.

Joseph Garner, DPhil is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He received his doctoral degree in (abnormal) animal behavior at the University of Oxford, Great Britain, conducted his postdoctoral training at UC Davis, and began his faculty career at Purdue University. His research interests include the development of refined methods in behavioral research; abnormal behaviors in animals and their relationships with abnormal behaviors in humans; mouse well-being and enrichment; and the scientific impact of well-being problems in lab animals.

For enrollment information go to Stanford University Registrar's site