Autumn Courses in Comparative Medicine AY 2018 - 2019

COMPMED 23N: Microbes that Made Plagues: Biological Causes and Social Effects

Preference to first-year students; sophomores admitted if space available.

3 units | Class # 11320 | Section 01 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit | ISS
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Tue, Thu 12:00 PM - 1:20 PM with Cherpes, T. (PI)
Instructor: Cherpes, T. (PI)
Notes: Introductory Seminar. Advance sign-up process and deadlines at http://introsems.stanford.edu.

Massive scale infections or plagues have often occurred, affecting millions for years or quickly killing thousands. In this seminar, we will use both biological and social lenses to examine infectious agents and the plagues they caused. To provide helpful framework for this exploration, we will begin with a very brief overview of the principles of microbiology and immunology. This will be followed by specific looks at the biological causes and social responses to Black Death, cholera, tuberculosis, the 1918 influenza pandemic, polio, and the ongoing HIV pandemic. We will conclude our seminar with similar looks at some of the infectious agents most likely to cause new pandemics.

Thomas L. Cherpes, MD, DVM is an assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine (Department of Comparative Medicine). My laboratory investigates the effects of hormonal contraception on anti-pathogen host defenses in the female genital tract. All students are welcome to participate in this seminar, and it may be particularly attractive to individuals interested in medicine and the history of medicine. 

For enrollment information go to Undergrad Introductory Seminar's site

COMPMED 80N: Animal behavior: sex, death, and sometimes food!

Freshman preference seminar; sophomores admitted if space available.                                  Check out our All Quarters Courses too!

3 units | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Class # 9865 | Section 01 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit | ISF
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Tue, Thu 11:30 AM - 1:20 PM at E.D. Stone Edwards Bldg R358 with Garner, J. (PI)
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.

Joseph Garner, DPhil is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He received his doctoral degree in (abnormal) animal behavior at the University of Oxford, Great Britain, conducted his postdoctoral training at UC Davis, and began his faculty career at Purdue University. His research interests include the development of refined methods in behavioral research; abnormal behaviors in animals and their relationships with abnormal behaviors in humans; mouse well-being and enrichment; and the scientific impact of well-being problems in lab animals.

His favorite experiments are ones where the animals tell you what's really going on by doing the opposite of what was predicted. He became interested in animal behavior because of its potential to open a window into the experience of the animals that share our world and our lives. He pursued a career in the field because it presents some of the hardest questions and most beautiful answers in science; and because of the great potential for animal behavior to improve both the lives of animals, and also the lives of humans. He serves on the boards of both animal well-being and human mental health advocacy organizations. None of the animal members of his own family are particularly well behaved, but he prefers them that way.

For enrollment information go to Undergrad Introductory Seminar's site

CompMed 83 Horse Medicine

2 units | Class # 29851 | Section 01 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit | LEC
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Wed 11:30 AM - 1:20 PM at E.D. Stone Edwards Bldg R358 with Green, S. (PI)

The course will explore most common equine diseases, ranging from colic to lameness are reviewed using problem-oriented approach. Topics include: equine infectious diseases, care of the newborn foal, medical emergencies, and neurological disorders. The course includes a 2 hour lab on the physical and neurological examination of the horse at the Stanford Red Barn. Students will also have the opportunity to ride polo ponies and learn the basics of polo during a trip tot the Stanford Polo Team Fields.

 

Sherril Green, DVM, PhD Professor and Department Chair, Dr. Green received her D.V.M. from Louisiana State University and completed an internship in Equine Medicine and Surgery at the University of Missouri, and aresidency in Large Animal Medicine at the University of Florida. Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford, she was a clinical instructor in Large Animal Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, and subsequently completed a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Green is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. Dr. Green’s research focuses on the biology and diseases of the African Clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

For enrollment information go to Stanford University Registrar's site.

COMPMED 87Q The Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

Sophomore preference seminar                                    Check out our All Quarters Courses too!


COMPMED 87Q | 3 units | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Class # 10303 | Section 01 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit | ISS
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Wed 2:30 PM - 4:20 PM at E.D. Stone Edwards Bldg R358 with Nagamine, C. (PI)
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Fri 1:30 PM - 3:20 PM at RAF 1 with Nagamine, C. (PI)

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on the laboratory mouse, a widely used and important research model. Topics include the ethics of animal use in research; the natural history, origin and husbandry of the mouse; characteristics of key mouse strains; its anatomy and physiology; common diseases and their effects on research; coat color genetics relative to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models; and genetic engineering of mice. The laboratory includes necropsy, handling, introduction to anesthesia and surgery, identification methods, and common research techniques using live and dead mice. Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Claude Nagamine, DVM, PhD, DACLAM, Associate Professor, received his Ph.D. in Ecology at the University of California, Davis in 1979 and his D.V.M. at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville in 2004. Prior to entering veterinary school he was an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in Laboratory Animal Medicine at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2007 and became board certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine in 2008. His research interests include mouse models of dengue virus, the molecular genetics of mammalian sex determination, and mouse infectious diseases. He joined the Stanford faculty in 2008 and is Director of Rodent Services and the Rodent Health Surveillance Program.

To enroll visit the Undergrad Introductory Seminar's site

COMPMED 202: Research Biomethodology for Laboratory Animal Science

2 units | Class # 10877 | Section 01 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit | SEM        Check out our All - Quarter Courses too!
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Fri 9:30 AM - 10:20 AM at RAF 1 with Pacharinsak, C. (PI)

Emphasis is on providing introductory training and practical, hands-on workshops for students interested in learning more about research biomethodology and animal models of human and animal disease. Topics include basic care and principals guiding the use of research animals, animal health and welfare, and research animal enrichment, basic mouse handling, rodent breeding, and the principals of rodent surgery and anesthesia. Content delivered online and in-person.

Cholawat Pacharinsak, DVM, PhD is a veterinary anesthesiologist, an assistant professor, and the director of Anesthesia, Pain Management, and Surgery in the Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford School of Medicine. He has a PhD in pain neuroscience, and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia (DACVAA). His research interests include understanding the neurobiology of cancer pain and acute pain models using behavioral and electrophysiological techniques. He also focuses on how to control pain effectively in a clinical setting.

For enrollment information contact Cholawat Pacharinsak, DVM, PhD

COMPMED 209: Laboratory Animal Medicine Seminar

2 units | Class # 10563 | Section 01 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC) | SEM
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Tue 1:30 PM - 2:50 PM at RAF 1 with Felt, S. (PI)
Instructors: Felt, S. (PI)
Notes: Please contact the Department Student Services coordinator for enrollment instructions.

Focuses on husbandry, care and diseases of major laboratory animal species (rodents, fish and amphibians, swine, sheep, rabbits, monkeys); regulatory and compliance, applied principals of animal modeling, and factors that influence animal research, animal behavior and research reproducibility. The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of the history of laboratory animal science, current industry standards and practices, and the fundamentals of laboratory animal diseases. Department consent required for enrollment. May be repeated for credit.

 

Stephen Felt, DVM, MPH is an Associate Professor in the Department of Comparative Medicine, School of Medicine. In his position, he performs clinical veterinary care, biomedical research and teaching. Prior to arriving at Stanford, he was stationed overseas as a US Army Veterinary Corps Officer and participated in a variety of disease outbreak investigations on the Asian and African Continents and served as a veterinary consultant to the World Health Organization. Dr. Felt earned his D.V.M. from the University of Wisconsin and his M.P.H. from the Uniformed Services University. He is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine and a Diplomate of the American College Laboratory Animal Medicine.

COMPMED 211: Biostatistics for the Life Sciences.

2 units | Class # 10765 | Section 01 | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit | SEM
09/24/2018 - 12/07/2018 Thu 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM in LK308 with Garner, J. (PI)

Preference to students in the MLAS program. Interested students should contact the Comparative Medicine Department to enroll. Emphasis is on real-world experimental design and analysis in the life sciences, with particular focus on modern techniques that maximize power and minimize sample size, and avoiding common errors contributing to false discovery and the reproducibility crisis. This is flipped-classroom. Class time is devoted to discussion of assigned reading (primarily Grafen & Hails 2002 "Modern statistics for the life sciences"), criticism of papers, working through example data sets, and developing analyses for the students' own data. The course studiously avoids the use of equations to explain anything. Enrollment is limited to MLAS students, unless student has course director consent.

Joseph Garner, DPhil is an Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine, and Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He received his doctoral degree in (abnormal) animal behavior at the University of Oxford, Great Britain, conducted his postdoctoral training at UC Davis, and began his faculty career at Purdue University. His research interests include the development of refined methods in behavioral research; abnormal behaviors in animals and their relationships with abnormal behaviors in humans; mouse well-being and enrichment; and the scientific impact of well-being problems in lab animals.

For enrollment information go to Stanford University Registrar's site

COMPMED 260: Masters Laboratory Animal Science Practicum/Laboratory Research

1-15 units | Class # 10884 | Section 01 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC) | INS

Research laboratory and clinical service (pathology, diagnostic laboratory, surgery, husbandry, anesthesiology, aquatics, facility business and management, etc.), quarterly rotations for students enrolled in the Master's of Laboratory Animal Science program. The objective of this course is to provide students with hands on experience in research laboratories using animal models and to provide experience working in the daily operations of a large, veterinary service center. Fulfills the practicum and research requirements of MLAS students.

COMPMED 290: MLAS Career Development

1 units | Class # 10785 | Section 03 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC) | INS

Focus is on career development for graduate students and trainees enrolled in a trainee program in the Department of Comparative Medicine. Seminar topics include career pathways in laboratory animal science, resume preparation, manuscript preparation and authorship, life in academics, life in industry and biopharma, regulatory agencies, veterinary and medical school. Speakers include faculty, speakers from industry and pharmaceutical companies, veterinary school and medical school graduates, regulatory and compliance professionals, research scientists, and animal research program/laboratory managers. Students may choose to shadow veterinary clinical faculty or rotate through basic science laboratory, by special arrangement. The objective is to introduce students to the multiple career pathways available to individuals with advanced training in laboratory animal science. May be taken up to six quarters.