Course Work

Overview of Required Courses

Students who pursue the Scholarly Concentration in Community Health solely or in conjunction with an application (i.e. Immunology, Global Health, Prevention Research), are required to complete a total of 12 units. If you are pursuing an application, the 6 units of elective course will be taken in the application area.

 

1. PEDS 250: The Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (3 units)

2. AND one of the following methods courses:

  • PEDS 202C: Qualitative Research Methods and Study Design (3 units)
  • MED 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation and Research (3 units)
  • HRP 258: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research (3 units)
  • Other methods course: If a student believes another methods course is more applicable to their project, a “written request” must be submitted to the Foundation Director for approval prior to taking the course. The request must include justification for why this course is needed to conduct the scholarly project.

 

3. AND a selection of elective courses (6 units):

  • Community Health Option: For students interested in completing all 12 units in Community Health, the 6 elective units can be selected based upon specific interests and preferences.
  • Application Option: For students interested in pursuing an application, the 6 elective units will be determined by the application director (i.e. Immunology, International Health).
  • Note: Students also may chose to build on their course work in the pursuit of a Master’s degree in Public Health, as a joint degree program between Stanford and the University of California, Berkeley. Any course taken in pursuit of a joint degree will count toward the 6 elective units.

Courses Descriptions

  • PEDS 250: Social and Environmental Determinants of Health (3 units) How race/ethnicity and SES contribute to health disparities, how vulnerable populations are uniquely at health risk, and how the built environment relates to health and wellness. Topics include: gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, individual SES and neighborhood SES as related to health; individual and structural race bias; health needs of vulnerable populations (e.g., the homeless, the incarcerated, immigrant populations, children, and uninsured/underinsured); and environmental forces (e.g., urban design/planning, traffic/car culture, green space, housing, food access/culture, law enforcement, and media).
  • PEDS 202C: Qualitative Research Methods and Study Design (3 units)Introduction to qualitative research methods and study design. Students gain practical experience designing a qualitative study. Explore qualitative methods through class lectures, foundational readings and hands-on learning. Core topics include: theoretical frameworks, research questions, methodological approaches (e.g., interviews, focus groups, participant observation, photovoice), data collection, sampling, reliability and validity, and IRB protocols. This course is designed for students needing support to plan and design an independent research project (e.g., Med Scholars, Honors Thesis). Prerequisite: Consent from instructor for undergraduates.
  • MED 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (3 units) Students will learn pragmatic skills necessary for the design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Based on in-class exercises, students will identify strengths and limitations of different study designs; construct interview and focus group questions; moderate focus groups; content analyze qualitative data using qualitative software; design questionnaire surveys, and correctly interpret commonly used statistical analyses. Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduates.
  • HRP 258: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research (3 units) Fundamentals of probability and statistics for clinical researchers. Equips students with the tools to understand and critically evaluate the medical literature. Topics to include: random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the Central Limit Theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and survival analysis.


  • Electives


    Course options include, but are not limited to:
  • Free Clinics
  •     MED 241: Context and Practice of Health Care in Free Clinics (1 unit)
  •     MED 229A: Partnering with Free Clinics to Reach the Underinsured (2 units)
  •     MED 229B: Partnering with Free Clinics to Reach the Underinsured (2 units)
  •  
  • Community-Based Clinics
  •     INDE XXXA: Partnering with Community-Based Clinics to Reach the Homeless (3 units)
  •     INDE XXXB: Partnering with Community-Based Clinics to Reach the Homeless (2 units)
  •  
  • Research
  •     HRP 259: Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology (3 units)
  •     PEDS 202A and 202B: Practical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis
        (2 course series; 3 units each)
  •  
  • Health/Wellness
  •     EDUC 193A: Listen Up! Core Peer Counseling Skills (2 units)
  •     EDUC 193P: Peer Counseling at the Bridge (1 unit)