Who We Are

Welcome to The Cancer Survivorship Research Team, the research group led by Dr. Oxana Palesh. Our lab is committed to promoting the well-being for women with breast cancer currently undergoing treatment, as well as supporting those throughout survivorship.

We have several ongoing studies aimed at bettering the lives of patients with cancer. We also have a number of exciting collaborations.

Recently, we have been getting ready for two new research efforts in collaboration with Dr. Shelli Kesler at UT Austin. Both studies aim to better understand and predict chemotherapy related cognitive impairments (also known as 'chemobrain') in breast cancer patients. These studies use MRI and cognitive testing to assess brain structure and function. Recruitment for these projects will begin shortly, and we invite you to reach out if you would like to learn more about participating in one of these studies.

Additionally, our NIH funded study MOSAIC: Management of Insomnia in Breast Cancer Patients is in its final year. We are excited to finish our behavioral intervention, and we will begin to review its efficacy once it is complete.

Lastly, we are a research collaborator of the Cancer Survivorship Program at Stanford Hospital, and we have recently concluded a survey study assessing the survivorship care needs of patients at the Women's Cancer Clinic. We hope the insights of this study will lead to better and more individualized supportive care for cancer survivors.

We invite you to learn more about our work through our website, and thank you for your interest in our research.

About Us

Our Team

Research

Publications

Highlights


MOSAIC Study in its final year

After five exciting years, our interventional sleep study examining the efficacy of the novel BBT-CI nears its completion in summer 2019. We hope our novel therapy will improve sleep and stop insomnia that plagues the wellbeing of 60% of breast cancer survivors. 

Two Studies: Pac-AI and ProBC2 have been awarded funding to study 'chemobrain'

'Chemobrain' is a common symptom that plagues breast cancer patients. For some, it remains a chronic and persistent problem even after chemotherapy is over. With collaborator Dr. Shelli Kesler, our lab has been granted NIH funding to study how it affects the brain, and how to predict who is most sucseptible.

Cancer Survivorship Database Recruitment Complete

The Breast and Gynecologic Database Pilot, a study aimed at understanding treatment side effects and supportive care needs is finished with recruitment. Now the research team will begin to analyze the data collected during the study

Time

'Chemobrain' is Real-- And More Likely With Certain Drugs

Researchers pinpoint the type of chemotherapy that is more likely to harm the brain of breast cancer patients

Stanford Medicine News Center

Study shows brain abnormalities in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

A neuroimaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found that when asked to perform certain tasks, women who have undergone chemotherapy for breast cancer had significantly less activation of a part of the brain known to play a critical role in planning, attention and memory than did breast cancer patients without such treatment, as well as healthy women.

US News & World Report

When You Have Cancer And Can't Sleep

Good rest is critical for healing, but for many cancer patients, quality sleep is only a dream.

Support our Mission

We would greatly appreciate your support to help keep our innovative research alive. Click the link to securely make a donation. Please be sure to fill out "Dr. Palesh's Cancer Survivorship Research Lab" in the Special Instructions text field.

 

Contact Us

Available M-F from 9am-6:30pm

Email: cancerwellness@stanford.edu

Phone: (650)723-6250