Excellence in Scientific Discovery

The Institute's comprehensive investigations extend from the earliest phase of basic discovery to the development of new cancer diagnostics, treatment protocols and prevention strategies

Research Programs

Basic, clinical and translational studies into the biology of cancer and the factors that contribute to its onset and growth.


Shared Resources

The most sophisticated technologies and research protocols are offered to SCI members through a number of core facilities.


Events & Seminars

Events and seminars allow cancer specialists to share knowledge and foster new collaborations.


Institute Membership

Scientists and physicians from a wide range of disciplines, all dedicated to reducing the burden of cancer.


Clinical Trial Support

The Cancer Clinical Trials Office provides regulatory and administrative services to SCI members conducting clinical trials.  


Funding Opportunities

Internal and external sources of support for both established cancer research programs and promising new ideas.  


News & Publications

Publications, press releases and news are shared with scientists, physicians, patients and friends of the Institute.


Training Opportunities

Education and professional development designed to train the next generation of cancer researchers and physicians.



National Cancer Institute Designation

News & Publications

  • Mom’s fundraising boosts tumor research

    Bereaved mother Mycah Clemons raised money for a summer scholarship at Stanford for research on diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. The move sparked a series of experiments that have led to a possible treatment for the tumor.


  • Lung cancer patient back from the brink

    Eight years after being diagnosed with stage-4 lung cancer, whose treatment led to other health complications, Ginger Powell is cancer-free. “Being cared for at Stanford gives me so much hope,” she said.


  • Altered immune cells attack brain tumor

    In mice, a fatal brainstem tumor was cleared by injecting it with engineered T cells that recognized the cancer and targeted it for destruction. The Stanford discovery is moving to human trials.