Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Imaging & Early Detection Profiles

Showing 1 - 10 of 40
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Graduate medical studies at Ludwig-Maximilians-University/Munich, Germany. Title of doctoral thesis: In vivo and in vitro H1-NMR-spectroscopy of intracerebral tumors. Residency in diagnostic radiology and fellowship in cardiovascular radiology at LMU/Munich. Title of professorial thesis: CT of coronary atherosclerosis. Professor of Radiology and section chief for body CT in the CT department at Grosshadern campus of LMU/Munich. Previous publications on CT radiation exposure, cerebral & cardiac CT angiography, cardiac perfusion CT, rotating C-arm CT in liver intervention and tumor response assessment in oncologic imaging.
    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics
    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)
    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)
    Professor of Pediatrics (Neonatology), Emeritus

    Bio

    Dr. Contag, is a Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Radiology and Microbiology & Immunology at Stanford University, and a member of BioX Faculty for interdisciplinary sciences, and Immunology Faculty. Dr. Contag received his B.S. in Biology from the University of Minnesota, St. Paul in 1982. He received his Ph.D. in Microbiology from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis in 1988 where he did his dissertation research under the direction of Professors Ashley Haase and Peter Plagemann on the topic of viral infections of the central nervous system. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University from 1990-1994 in the Department of Microbiology where he studied mother-to-infant transmission of HIV, and then joined the faculty in Pediatrics at Stanford in 1995 with a joint appointment in Microbiology and Immunology and a courtesy appointment in Radiology. Dr. Contag is the Associate Chief of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, director of Stanford’s Center for Innovation in In Vivo Imaging (SCI3) and co-director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Dr. Contag is a pioneer in the field of molecular imaging and is developing imaging approaches aimed at revealing molecular processes in living subjects, including humans, and advancing therapeutic strategies through imaging. His laboratory develops macroscopic and microscopic optical imaging tools and uses imaging to assess tissue responses to stress, reveal immune cell migration patterns, understand stem cell biology and advance biological therapies. He is a founding member, and a past president of the Society for Molecular Imaging, and for his fundamental contributions in imaging, is a recipient of the Achievement Award from the Society for the Molecular Imaging. Dr. Contag is a Fellow of the World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) and currently President Elect of WMIS. The research mission of the Contag laboratory is to develop and use noninvasive imaging tools that can simultaneously reveal the nuances of biological processes and provide an overall picture of disease states for the purpose of developing and refining novel interventions. These imaging tools are sensitive and image over a range of scales from micro- to macroscopic, and are well-suited for the in vivo study of cellular and molecular biology. For the purpose of studying tumor biology in vivo, the Contag group is developing, and using, advanced microscopic tools with the aims of detecting and studying cancer at high resolution in vivo. These approaches use micro-optics to develop miniaturized cofocal microscopes and Raman endoscopes that can reach inside the body to interrogate disease states. This is enabling point-of-care microscopy that is changing the diagnostic paradigm from biopsy and histopathology to in vivo pathology. The opportunity to study tumor margins with arrays of microscopes will enable improved tumor detection and guided resections.
    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor in Chemistry

    Bio

    Professor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels. Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. in Beijing (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). His doctoral work under Dr. Charles Lieber at Harvard U. (Ph.D. 1994) focused on charge-density waves and superconductivity. During postdoctoral research at Rice U. with Dr. Richard Smalley, he developed carbon nanotube probes for atomic force microscopy. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, AAAS and National Academy of Sciences. The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis. Nanomaterials The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers. Nanoscale Physics and Electronics High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics. Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation. Electrocatalysis and Batteries The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Bio

    Heike Elisabeth Daldrup-Link is a clinician-scientist in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University with subspecialisation in pediatric radiology, pediatric oncology imaging, and molecular imaging. Dr. Daldrup-Link trained at the University of Münster and the Technical University of Munich, Germany. She worked as an Assistant and Associate Professor at the University of California, San Francisco from 2003 to 2010, before joining Stanford Radiology in 2010. Her research interest focuses on the development of novel pediatric molecular imaging techniques, which interface observations of living cells with nanoparticle development and multimodality imaging technologies: Dr. Daldrup-Link developed several novel concepts for pediatric oncology imaging, such as tumor characterization through the EPR effect (US6009342-A), MR imaging of tumor associated inflammation with iron oxide nanoparticles (Clin Ca Res 2011), image-guided cancer therapy without side effects through tumor-enzyme activatable theranostic nanoparticles (Small 2014) and radiation-free whole body staging of children with cancer (Lancet Oncology 2014). Dr. Daldrup-Link’s cellular imaging studies also yielded several new and patented ideas for in vivo imaging of stem cell transplants establishing immediately clinically applicable technologies for: in vivo stem cell tracking with FDA-approved nanoparticles (US14/161,315), in vivo imaging of stem cell rejection processes with immune-cell targeted tracers, and MRI-detection of stem cell apoptosis with enzyme-activatable contrast agents (ACS Nano 2015). Over the past 10 years, Dr. Daldrup-Link's team has received 77 honors and awards for innovative cellular imaging research.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering
    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    Dr. Demirci is currently a Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine with tenure at the Canary Center for Early Cancer Detection. Prior to his Stanford appointment, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and at Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology serving at the Division of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Infectious Diseases and Renal Division. He leads a group of 20+ researchers focusing on micro- and nano-scale technologies. He received his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1999 as a James B. Angell Scholar (summa cum laude) from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his M.S. degree in 2001 in Electrical Engineering, M.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering in 2005, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2005, all from Stanford University. The Demirci Bio-Acoustic MEMS in Medicine Lab (BAMM) specializes in applying micro- and nanoscale technologies to problems in medicine at the interface between micro/nanoscale engineering and medicine. Our goal is apply innovative technologies to clinical problems. Our major research theme focuses on creating new microfluidic technology platforms targeting broad applications in medicine. In this interdisciplinary space at the convergence of engineering, biology and materials science, we create novel technologies for disposable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and monitoring of infectious diseases, cancer and controlling cellular microenvironment in nanoliter droplets for biopreservation and microscale tissue engineering applications. These applications are unified around our expertise to test the limits of cell manipulation by establishing microfluidic platforms to provide solutions to real world problems at the clinic. Our lab creates technologies to manipulate cells in nanoliter volumes to enable solutions for real world problems in medicine including applications in infectious disease diagnostics and monitoring for global health, cancer early detection, cell encapsulation in nanoliter droplets for cryobiology, and bottom-up tissue engineering. Dr. Demirci has published over 120 peer reviewed publications in journals including PNAS, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Small, Trends in Biotechnology, Chemical Society Reviews and Lab-chip, over 150 conference abstracts and proceedings, 10+ book chapters, and an edited book. His work was highlighted in Wired Magazine, Nature Photonics, Nature Medicine, MIT Technology Review, Reuters Health News, Science Daily, AIP News, BioTechniques, and Biophotonics. He is fellow-elect of the American Institute of Biological and Medical Engineering (AIMBE, 2017). His scientific work has been recognized by numerous national and international awards including the NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2012), the IEEE-EMBS Early Career Achievement Award (2012), Scientist of the year award from Stanford radiology Department (2017). He was selected as one of the world’s top 35 young innovators under the age of 35 (TR-35) by the MIT Technology Review at the age of 28. In 2004, he led a team that won the Stanford University Entrepreneur’s Challenge Competition and Global Start-up Competition in Singapore. His work has been translated to start-up companies including DxNow, KOEK Biotechnology and LEVITAS. There has been over 10,000 live births in the US, Europe and Turkey using the sperm selection technology that came out of Dr. Demirci's lab. He has been cited over 2500 times within the last two years (H index, 48).

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