Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Translational Oncology Profiles

Showing 41 - 48 of 48
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Sandy Srinivas specializes in urologic oncology and takes care of patients with prostate, bladder, kidney, testes, penile and adrenal cancers. She has practiced in this field now for more than 20 years . She is the clinical research group leader for Urologic Program at Stanford and is a principle investigator on numerous trials in urologic Oncology. She serves on the National Comphrehensive Cancer Center (NCCN) panel for prostate cancer and has coauthored numerous publications and book chapters.
    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)

    Bio

    Our research focuses on understanding fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying cancer development. Currently, we study signaling cascades initiated by cell surface receptors which are involved in: 1) the early event of prostate cancer initiation and 2) regulation of the transition from indolent to metastatic disease. The long term goal of our laboratory is to improve the stratification of indolent from aggressive prostate cancer and aid the development of better therapeutic strategies for the advanced disease. Additionally, we are interested in understanding molecular mechanism that govern the self-renewal activity of adult stem cells and cancer stem cells. We use molecular biology techniques, cell culture based adult stem cell assays, in vivo tissue regeneration models of cancer.
    Associate Professor of Dermatology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Jean Tang, M.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Dermatology. Dr Tang's research focuses on genetic skin diseases such as Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome and Epidermolysis Bullosa clinical trials. She studies new ways to treat and prevent NSMC and melanoma, and the relationship between sun protection and vitamin D. She conducts preclinical studies in mice, clinical trials in high risk patients and also conducts secondary data analysis using large national datasets. Dr. Tang has led or co-led the conduct and completion of 4 investigator initiated clinical trials with 3 trials focused on BCC cancer treatment and/or prevention. She received her MD/PhD from Stanford, completed her dermatology residency at Stanford, and then went to UCSF for a 3 year post-doc in mouse genetics, while simultaneously pursuing formal coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, and clinical trial design in the KL2 CTSI program.
    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Heather Wakelee specializes in the treatment of lung cancer, thymoma and mesothelioma. She has been in practice for over a decade at Stanford University. She is the physician lead for the thoracic malignancies clinical research group and has developed research programs related to lung cancer and thymoma across multiple areas including clinical trials, translation work and population sciences. She is the Principal Investigator on numerous clinical trials. Dr. Wakelee is the faculty director of the Stanford Cancer Clinical Trials office and is the lead investigator for ECOG-ACRIN clinical trials group at Stanford. She is also active in many national and international organizations related to lung cancer and thymoma including leadership roles in the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and the International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group (ITMIG).
    Francis W. Bergstrom Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio

    The Wender Group addresses unsolved problems in chemistry, synthesis, biology, medicine, and materials science using new computational tools, new reactions, reagents, strategies and design. Leveraging affiliations with the Medical School, Imaging Center, Chemical Biology Program and Molecular Therapeutics Program as well as numerous internal and external collaborations, the lab emphasizes the use of chemistry, design and synthesis to address problems of significance in biology and medicine, including eradication of HIV/AIDS, overcoming resistant cancer, cancer immunotherapy and treating cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Paul Wender received his B.S. degree from Wilkes University and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Yale University. He was an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow at Columbia University. He served on the faculty at Harvard University and joined the faculty at Stanford University where he is the Francis W. Bergstrom Professor of Chemistry and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Chemical and Systems Biology. Professor Wender’s research has been recognized with numerous awards including recently the Tetrahedron Prize, Prelog Medal (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), Arthur Cope Award (American Chemical Society), Cohen Award for Excellence in Medicinal Chemistry (Israel Chemical Society), and Research Award of the German Bioactives and Biotechnology Leibniz Allaince. He has also been recognized with several teaching awards including the Hoagland Prize, Bing Teaching Award, and the Dean's Teaching Award. He is an elected member of the US National Academy of Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Spanish Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Bio

    Dr. Joy Wu is a board-certified endocrinologist with over 12 years' experience who specializes in treating women and men with osteoporosis and other bone and mineral diseases, including primary hyperparathyroidism, vitamin D deficiency, Paget's disease and fibrous dysplasia. She has a special interest in optimizing skeletal health for those at risk of bone loss from glucocorticoid treatment, cancer therapies, or organ transplant. She works closely with each individual and his/her referring physician to assess fracture risk, and to develop a tailored treatment and monitoring plan. Dr. Wu directs a broad basic and translational research program that focuses on skeletal development and the bone marrow hematopoietic niche. Her laboratory is currently studying stem cell therapies for bone formation, and the prevention of cancer metastases to bone (joywulab.stanford.edu). She has been honored with awards from the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, the Endocrine Society, the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, and the Mary Kay Foundation. Dr. Wu is committed to training the next generation of physician scientists, and serves as Co-Director of the Stanford Internal Medicine Translational Investigator Program.
    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Bio

    A pioneer in the use of lasers to study chemical reactions at the molecular level, Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor Richard N. Zare pursues diverse theoretical and experimental interests in physical chemistry and nanoscale chemical analysis. The Zarelab has made a broad impact in analytic chemistry with development of laser-induced fluorescence to study reaction dynamics, and seminal contributions to understanding of molecular collision processes. The group continues to invent tools and measurement techniques to study phenomena from reaction in microdroplets to drug delivery. Born in 1939 in Cleveland, Ohio, Professor Zare trained in physical and analytical chemistry at Harvard University (B.A. 1961, Ph.D. 1964). His doctoral study under Professor Dudley Herschbach explored photodissociation dynamics. After faculty positions spanning chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, chemistry, physics and astrophysics at the University of Colorado, and chemistry at Columbia University, he joined the Stanford chemistry faculty in 1977. He has taught an introductory chemistry class every year since. As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor since 2006, Professor Zare has also developed a course introducing undergraduates to hands-on interdisciplinary research, combining physics, and biology to explore how living systems use molecular interactions with light for vision, photosynthesis and more. Professor Zare served as chair of the Department of Chemistry from 2005 to 2011, and has helped to guide scientific policy as chairman of several national and international science boards. His dedication to research and teaching has been recognized in many awards, including the National Medal of Science, the Wolf Prize in Chemistry, and the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. Among other honors, Professor Zare is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He has also received 11 honorary doctorates. Current research in the Zarelab explores wide-ranging questions in physical and analytical chemistry, from the study of elementary chemical reactions to chemical analysis of extraterrestrial materials. The major focus of these efforts is chemical analysis on the nanoscale. The team has devised tools and techniques to examine molecules in extremely tiny volumes – the volumes characteristic of what is found in heterogeneous structures in mineral samples or in the contents of cells and subcellular compartments. Group members have also made contributions to the chemical analysis of liquid samples separated using a capillary format by electrophoresis or electrochromatography. Some “firsts” include the use of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to analyze trace species in solution, development of detectors for capillary electrophoresis based on the techniques of laser-induced fluorescence, and CCD imaging, and the use of mass spectrometric imaging of tissue samples by means of desorption electrospray ionization. Please visit the Zarelab website to learn more: http://web.stanford.edu/group/Zarelab/

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