Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Translational Oncology Profiles

Showing 31 - 40 of 48
    Susy Yuan-Huey Hung Professor

    Bio

    Mark D. Pegram, MD, is the first director of the Breast Cancer Oncology Program at Stanford Women’s Cancer Center. He is also the co-director of Stanford’s Molecular Therapeutics Program. He is a renowned clinician and scholar in breast cancer research and a leader in translational medicine. Dr. Pegram played a major role in developing the drug Herceptin as a treatment for HER2-positive breast cancer, which constitutes about 20 percent of all cases. His laboratory experiments demonstrated that combining Herceptin with chemotherapy effectively killed cancer cells that overproduced the growth factor HER2. Dr. Pegram and others then conducted clinical trials showing that Herceptin improved survival rates and even cured some breast cancer patients. This remains one of the premier examples of bench-to-bedside translational research. Dr. Pegram’s current research efforts include a continued focus on the cancer-associated gene that encodes HER2 and developing new ways to target cancer cells expressing this protein. He is also pursuing strategies to target estrogen receptors, implicated in some 70 percent of all breast cancer cases. Dr. Pegram earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of North Carolina before joining the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles. He spent five years at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, where he was a Sylvester Chair professor of medicine in the Braman Family Breast Cancer Institute and associate director for clinical research in the University’s Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. He joined the Stanford faculty in 2012.
    Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine
    Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio

    Eben Rosenthal is a surgeon-scientist and academic leader. He is currently serving as the John and Ann Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center, a position he has held since July 2015. He works collaboratively with the Stanford Cancer Institute and Stanford Health Care leaders to set the strategy for the clinical delivery of cancer care across Stanford Medicine and growing cancer networks. Before coming to Stanford, he learned his surgical skills in otolaryngology from the University of Michigan and traveled west for further training in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Oregon Health and Science University. He joined the faculty at University of Alabama at Birmingham where he started as an Assistant Professor of Surgery within the Division of Otolaryngology. In 2012, Dr. Rosenthal became Division Director of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and the holder of the John S. Odess Endowed Chair at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He moved to Stanford in 2015 to become the Ann and John Doerr Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center. Dr. Rosenthal is certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology and is a Diplomat of the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He specializes in the treatment and reconstruction of head and neck cancer patients. He has a strong interest in development of new strategies to surgically repair complex head and neck defects to improve functional and cosmetic outcomes. He has published over 160 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, authored many book chapters and published a book on optical imaging in cancer. He is on the editorial board of Head & Neck and The Laryngoscope and is also a charter member of the NIH Developmental Therapeutics Study Section. Dr. Rosenthal has performed preclinical and clinical research on the role of targeted therapies for use to treat cancer alone and in combination with conventional therapy. He has served as principal investigator on several early phase investigator-initiated and industry sponsored clinical trials in molecular oncology. He has received grant funding from the American Cancer Society, NIH/NCI and NIH/NIDCR to study the role of targeted therapy and novel imaging strategies in cancer. Dr. Rosenthal has conducted bench to bedside development of optical contrast agents to identify cancer in the operating room. He led a multidisciplinary team of scientists through successful IND application to allow testing of fluorescently labeled antibodies in the clinic and operating room. These early phase clinical trials have demonstrated that this technique can visualize microscopic cancer in the operating room and may significantly improve clinical outcomes.
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and of Biomedical Data Science

    Bio

    Dr. Nigam Shah is associate professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) at Stanford University, Assistant Director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, and a core member of the Biomedical Informatics Graduate Program. Dr. Shah's research focuses on combining machine learning and prior knowledge in medical ontologies to enable use cases of the learning health system. Dr. Shah received the AMIA New Investigator Award for 2013 and the Stanford Biosciences Faculty Teaching Award for outstanding teaching in his graduate class on “Data driven medicine”. Dr. Shah was elected into the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) in 2015 and is inducted into the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) in 2016. He holds an MBBS from Baroda Medical College, India, a PhD from Penn State University and completed postdoctoral training at Stanford University.
    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Shrager assumed the role of Professor and Chief of the Division of Thoracic Surgery in July 2008. He came to Stanford from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine where he served as Associate Professor and Chief of Thoracic Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Hospital. He earned his medical degree at Harvard, trained in surgery at Penn, and completed his thoracic surgery training at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Shrager has been identified as one of “America’s Top Doctors” and one of “America’s Top Doctors for Cancer” in Castle Connolly’s prestigious listings for multiple years running. Dr. Shrager has been awarded US News and World Report “Top Doctor” recognition in every year since that rating system was inaugurated in 2012 ; this award places him among the top 1% of thoracic surgeons nationwide based upon reviews by physician-peers. Evidence of his expert status among his peers also includes membership on the editorial board of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. Dr. Shrager practices all aspects of thoracic surgery but has specials interest and experience in lung cancer, surgery for emphysema, and mediastinal diseases. His clinical publications reflect these interests. In all cases, he looks towards minimally invasive approaches where appropriate, including VATS (thoracoscopic) lobectomy for early stage lung cancer and transcervical thymectomy. In the basic research realm, Dr. Shrager has focused upon the responses of the respiratory muscles to various disease states and interventions. His lab’s work has been published in important journals such as The New England Journal of Medicine, The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, and The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology)

    Bio

    Branimir I. (Brandy) Sikic, M. D., is Professor of Medicine in the Division of Oncology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is Co-director of the Stanford University Center for Clinical and Translational Education and Research (Spectrum) and Director of the Stanford Clinical and Translational Research Unit (CTRU). He received his undergraduate education at Georgetown University, and an M. D. from the University of Chicago. He returned to Georgetown for his residency in internal medicine, and performed a research fellowship in cancer pharmacology at the National Cancer Institute and in medical oncology at Georgetown prior to his appointment to the Stanford University faculty in 1979. He has authored more than 240 publications, edited two books, and is the inventor of two U.S. patents. His publications have been cited more than 13,300 times and their research impact is very high, with an h-factor of 65. He has served on several advisory committees of the National Institutes of Health, including as chairman of the Experimental Therapeutics I Study Section. In 2005-6 he chaired the Scientific Program Committee for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), and in 2008-9 was co-chair of the Program Committee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). In 2010 he was awarded the Katarina Zrinska medal for science and medicine by the president of Croatia. Dr. Sikic is a leader in the pharmacology of anticancer drugs and the development of new cancer therapies. His research spans the spectrum from molecular and genetic approaches in cancer cells to clinical trials in cancer patients. Dr. Sikic's laboratory studies mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells and the development of more effective cancer therapies. He has made major contributions to understanding the problem of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Current molecular and genetic studies of drug resistance in cellular and murine models include epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), tubulin dynamicity, IAP inhibitors, and the CCL2/CCR2 pathway. In collaboration with Irv Weissman and Jens Volkmer, we are studying CD47-SIRPa signaling to ovarian cancers. Active clinical trials of new anticancer drugs include antibodies activating the T-cell regulating CD27 pathway and the macrophage regulating CD47 pathway.
    Thomas A. Stamey Research Professor in Urology

    Bio

    Dr. Skinner received her undergraduate degree in Human Biology from Stanford and MD from Keck USC Medical School. She completed a residency in Urology at LAC+USC Medical Center, and a fellowship in Urologic Oncology under Dr. Donald Skinner at the Norris Cancer Center at USC. She was on the faculty at USC from 1990 through 2012. She was recruited to Stanford University to become Chair of the Department of Urology in May 2012. Dr. Skinner has received a number of awards including a Stop Cancer career development award, numerous teaching awards and listing in “Best Doctors” for over a decade. Her primary focus has been in the surgical treatment of locally advanced bladder cancer and is a nationally recognized expert in bladder reconstruction and continent urinary diversion. She has active ongoing clinical trials in the treatment of bladder cancer and other urologic malignancies.
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cancer

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