Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Imaging & Early Detection Profiles

Showing 31 - 40 of 40
    Boston Scientific Applied Biomedical Engineering Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    Norbert Pelc is a Professor in the Departments of Bioengineering, Radiology, and by courtesy, Electrical Engineering. His primary research interests are in the physics, engineering, and mathematics of diagnostic imaging and the development of applications of this imaging technology. His current work focuses on computed tomography, specifically in methods to improve the information content and image quality and to reduce the radiation dose from these examinations. He holds a doctorate and master degrees in Medical Radiological Physics from Harvard University and a BS from the University of Wisconsin in Madison. He served on the first National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and of Biomedical Data Science
    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry
    Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Radiology (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and, by courtesy, of Ophthalmology

    Bio

    Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS is Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Radiology, Medicine (Biomedical Informatics), and Ophthalmology (courtesy) at Stanford University. He is Principal Investigator of two centers in the National Cancer Institute's Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) and is Director of Biomedical Informatics for the Stanford Cancer Institute. He also leads the Research Informatics Center (RIC) of the School of Medicine (https://med.stanford.edu/ric.html). He previously chaired the Informatics Committee of the ECOG-ACRIN cooperative group, of the QIN Executive Committee, and of the RadLex Steering Committee of the Radiological Society of North America. His NIH-funded research program focuses on quantitative imaging and integrating imaging data with clinical and molecular data to discover imaging phenotypes that can predict the underlying biology, define disease subtypes, and personalize treatment. He is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI), Fellow of the Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM), and recipient of the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Academy for Radiology & Biomedical Imaging Research. He has published over 240 scientific publications in biomedical imaging informatics and radiology.
    Professor of Radiology (Early Detection), of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Bio

    Dr. Soh received his B.S. with a double major in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science with Distinction from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1999 to 2003, Dr. Soh served as the technical manager of MEMS Device Research Group at Bell Laboratories and Agere Systems. He was a faculty member at UCSB before joining Stanford in 2015. His current research interests are in analytical biotechnology, especially in high-throughput screening, directed evolution, and integrated biosensors.
    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    The Solgaard group focus on design and fabrication of nano-photonics and micro-optical systems. We combine photonic crystals, optical meta-materials, silicon photonics, and MEMS, to create efficient and reliable systems for communication, sensing, imaging, and optical manipulation.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    My interests are in the field of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and the development of new methods of imaging metabolism within the body. Current projects include 13C MRS of hyperpolarized substrates for the assessment of glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and other key metabolic pathways, optimized mapping of 1H metabolite distributions throughout the body, and quantifying neurotransmitter levels and cycling rates in the brain. In our laboratory, we have focussed on a novel array of both acquisition and analysis techniques for use in preclinical and clinical studies. These developments, which include improved spectroscopic imaging and shimming methods, multinuclear NMR studies, application of estimation theory for optimal data quantification, and the synthesis of new hyperpolarizeable 13C probes, address the inherent difficulties of low concentrations of the desired components, overlapping resonances, and magnetic field inhomogeneities caused by imperfect magnets and magnetic susceptibility variations with the body. Primary applications of this work include cancer diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and prediction of response to therapy, assessment of cardiac function, improved understanding and treatment of metabolic diseases (e.g. diabetes, liver failure) and neurologic disorders including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and epilepsy.
    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Bio

    Wang is engaged in the research of nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers. His research group utilizes modern thin film techniques, lithography, and nanoengineering to devise tailorable materials and devices with novel properties and desirable performances for practical applications. He has over 250 publications, and holds 56 patents (issued and pending), and is an author of the textbook entitled Magnetic Information Storage Technology, and is working on another entitled Biochips and Medical imaging. He was elected a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) for his seminal contributions to magnetic materials and nanosensors.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    I am a neuroradiologist with a specific interest and expertise in stroke, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, movement disorders and psychiatric disorders. I received my training in Diagnostic Radiology at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland followed by a fellowship in Diagnostic Neuroradiology at the University of California, San Francisco. I have a degree in biomedical engineering from the Swiss federal Institute of technology and a master in clinical research from the University of San Francisco. I worked as a faculty at the University of California, San Francisco, at the University of Virginia, and I am currently a Professor of Radiology and the Chief of Neuroradiology at the Stanford University. I am the chair of the research committee of the American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR). In this role, I developed the ASNR research study groups, including one focusing on cervical and intracranial wall imaging, one focusing on brain tumor imaging and genomics, and one addressing clinical translation of functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to conditions such as traumatic brain injury and chronic stroke. I am the chair of the imaging working group of the NINDS-funded stroke clinical trial network (StrokeNET). I was a member of the neuroimaging core lab in the DIAS 2 trial, and reviewed centrally the imaging data collected as part of this trial. I helped with the implementation of perfusion-CT as a penumbral imaging method for the MR-RESCUE trial. I am currently leading the imaging core lab for the NIH-funded Vasculopathy in Pediatric Stroke (VIPS) study, which aims at identifying the role and etiology of arteriopathy in pediatric stroke patients.
    Assistant Professor of Structural Biology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

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