Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Profiles

Showing 211 - 220 of 458
    Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Endocrinology)
    Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Bio

    Recipient of the Outstanding Scientific Contributions in Health Psychology Award from the American Psychological Association, Dr. King's research focuses on the development, evaluation, and translation of public health interventions to reduce chronic disease. Her current research focuses on expanding the reach and generalizability of evidence-based interventions through use of state-of-the-art communication technologies; community-based participatory research perspectives to address health disparities among disadvantaged populations; and policy-level approaches to health promotion. She has served on a number of government taskforces in the U.S. and abroad, including membership on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Scientific Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2020, and the Science Board of the U.S. President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition. An elected member of the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research and Past President of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, in 2014 she received honors from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) for outstanding research targeting health inequities. Her research on Citizen Science engagement to promote healthful living environments for All was honored in 2015 with an international excellence award. She has received the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s Distinguished Research Mentor Award, and has twice received the Stanford Prevention Research Center’s Outstanding Contributions to Teaching Award.
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Cancer Center
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Bio

    Dr. Susan Knox specializes in the treatment of breast cancer and melanoma, and sees a variety of general radiation oncology patients. She has practiced as a radiation oncologist for more than 25 years. A primary area of research in Dr. Knox’s laboratory is the study of novel therapies (targeted therapies, radiosensitizers, radioprotectors, and biological response modifiers) for the treatment of solid tumors, with a particular focus on prostate cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, using small animal tumor models. Her research is interdisciplinary and spans the study of mechanisms of action at the molecular level to translational studies and early clinical trials. Her drug discovery/development work, and research on innovative therapeutic approaches has resulted in 3 new ongoing clinical trials. A major focus of both her laboratory and clinical research is the use of radiation as a component of in situ tumor vaccine strategies. She has had a long -standing interest in clinical research and has served as a PI on numerous clinical trials and as a member of the Clinical Oncology Study Section. As the Faculty Director of the PRMS for the Stanford Cancer Institute, she oversees the Scientific Review Committee and chairs the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee.
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Cancer Center
    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    Bio

    Matthew Kohrman joined Stanford’s faculty in 1999. His research and writing bring multiple methods to bear on the ways health, culture, and politics are interrelated. Focusing on the People's Republic of China, he engages various intellectual terrains such as governmentality, gender theory, political economy, critical science studies, and embodiment. His first monograph, Bodies of Difference: Experiences of Disability and Institutional Advocacy in the Making of Modern China, examines links between the emergence of a state-sponsored disability-advocacy organization and the lives of Chinese men who have trouble walking. In recent years, Kohrman has been conducting research projects aimed at analyzing and intervening in the biopolitics of cigarette smoking and production. These projects expand upon analytical themes of Kohrman’s disability research and engage in novel ways techniques of public health.
    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center
    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Bio

    Eric Kool received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia University and did postdoctoral work in nucleic acids chemistry at Caltech. He started his career at the University of Rochester before moving to Stanford in 1999, where he is the George and Hilda Daubert Professor of Chemistry. He teaches Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology to undergraduate and graduate students. The Kool lab uses the tools of chemistry to study the structures, interactions and biological activities of nucleic acids and the enzymes that process them. Molecular design and synthesis play a major role in this work, followed by analysis of structure and function, both in test tubes and in living systems. These studies are aimed at gaining a better basic understanding of biology, and applying this knowledge to practical applications in biomedicine. As part of this research, members of the group synthesize designer nucleobases and nucleotides, with unusual properties such as fluorescence, enzyme reactivity, or altered shape and H-bonding ability. We use these as tools to study DNA polymerase enzymes, DNA repair pathways, and RNA modifying enzymes. This work is leading to new probes for diagnosis of cancer, useful fluorescent tags for biology, and fluorescent sensors of many species such as cancer metabolites and toxic metals.
    Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emerita
    Director Strategic Research Development, Rad/Radiology Finance and Administration

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