Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Immunology & Immunotherapy of Cancer Profiles

Showing 21 - 30 of 32
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    I am a physician-scientist who has established a human translational research group that fosters the development of both laboratory immunologists, and clinical translational researchers. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) cures blood cancer via beneficial graft-v-tumor immunity. Our overall research goal is to augment GVT while preventing dertimental graft versus host disease (GVHD). The Miklos lab pioneered protein microarray technologies to disciiver clinically relevant allogeneic antibodies, especially those targeting H-Y antigens following sex mismatched transplantation. Our discovery that allogeneic HY antibodies develop in association with chronic GVHD revealed a critical B cell role in chronic GVHD pathogenesis and our clinical trials established cGVHD therapeutic benefits using anti-B cell drugs rituximab and ibrutinib. We developed high-throughput sequencing of the B and T cell immune receptor thereby enabling: 1) lymphoid disease quantification, 2) detailed B and T cell donor reconstitution kinetics, and 3) clonal analysis of antigen specific responses following allo-HCT. Immunotherapy is revolutionizing cancer treatment and as the Stanford Clinical Cancer Cell Therapy program develops and evaluates the most promising cutting-edge cell therapies for cancer patients on a variety of clinical trials. Chimeric Antigen T Cell (CAR-T) therapy targets the patient's T lymphocytes to attack their cancer by infecting their own T cells to express chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) proteins that target and kill cancer cell expressing surface proteins. Thus far, the most successful CAR-T have targeted B cell antigen CD19, and ongoing trials are treating patients with relapsed/refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) using this CAR19 therapy.
    Professor of Genetics (Stem Cell)

    Bio

    Hiro Nakauchi obtained a M.D. from Yokohama City University School of Medicine and a Ph.D. in immunology from University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine. He isolated CD8 genes during his post-doc period at the Laboratory of Prof. Leonard Herzenberg at Stanford University. After returning to Japan, he started working on hematopoietic stem cells in his laboratory at RIKEN. In 1994, he became Professor of Immunology at the University of Tsukuba where he demonstrated that a single hematopoietic stem cell could reconstitute the entire hematopoietic system, a definitive experimental proof for the “stemness”. Since April 2002, he has been a Professor of Stem Cell Therapy in the Institute of Medical Science at The University of Tokyo (IMSUT). In 2008, he was appointed Director of newly established Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at IMSUT. Just recently, he returned to Stanford University as a faculty to continue his stem cell research at the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. Goals of his work are to translate discoveries in basic research into practical medical applications.
    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)

    Bio

    Robert S. Negrin, MD is a Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation at Stanford University. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of California at Berkeley and MD from Harvard University. He trained in medicine and hematology at Stanford University and joined the faculty in 1990. His research work has focused on cellular immunology in particular developing a more fundamental understanding of complex biological reactions such as graft versus host and graft vs tumor reactions in animal models and in the clinic. He has authored over 225 original papers, 40 book chapters and a book. He has received a number of awards including the Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award and is a member of the Association of American Physicians. He was previously the President of the International Society of Cellular Therapy and the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. He served as an Associate Editor of the journal Blood and is the founding editor of Blood Advances.
    Professor of Structural Biology and of Microbiology and Immunology
    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Rezvani is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Blood & Marrow Transplantation at Stanford University. His focus includes clinical care of patients undergoing allogeneic and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation, as well as clinical research aimed at improving outcomes and reducing complications of these transplants. He has conducted both retrospective and prospective clinical research in support of these aims. He also teaches and serves as a research mentor for fellows in the Division of Blood & Marrow Transplant at Stanford.
    Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) and of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)

    Bio

    Maria Grazia Roncarolo, MD is the co-director of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, the George D. Smith Professor in Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine (blood and marrow transplantation), chief of the Division of Pediatric Stem Cell Transplantation and Regenerative Medicine, and co-director of the Bass Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases. Dr. Roncarolo leads efforts to translate scientific discoveries in genetic diseases and regenerative medicine into novel patient therapies, including treatments based on stem cells and gene therapy. A pediatric immunologist by training, she earned her medical degree at the University of Turin, Italy. She spent her early career in Lyon, France, where she focused on severe inherited metabolic and immune diseases, including severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), better known as the "bubble boy disease." Dr. Roncarolo was a key member of the team that carried out the first stem cell transplants given before birth to treat these genetic diseases. While studying inherited immune diseases, Dr. Roncarolo discovered a new class of T cells. These cells, called T regulatory type 1 cells, help maintain immune system homeostasis by preventing autoimmune diseases and assisting the immune system in tolerating transplanted cells and organs. Recently, Dr. Roncarolo completed the first clinical trial using T regulatory type 1 cells to prevent severe graft-versus-host disease in leukemia patients receiving blood-forming stem-cell transplants from donors who were not genetic matches. Dr. Roncarolo worked for several years at DNAX Research Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology in Palo Alto, where she contributed to the discovery of novel cytokines, cell-signaling molecules that are part of the immune response. She studied the role of cytokines in inducing immunological tolerance and in promoting stem cell growth and differentiation. Dr. Roncarolo developed new gene-therapy approaches, which she pursued as director of the Telethon Institute for Cell and Gene Therapy at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan. She was the principal investigator leading the successful gene therapy trial for SCID patients who lack an enzyme critical to DNA synthesis, which is a severe life-threatening disorder. That trial is now considered the gold standard for gene therapy in inherited immune diseases. Under her direction, the San Raffaele Scientific Institute has been seminal in showing the efficacy of gene therapy for otherwise untreatable inherited metabolic diseases and primary immunodeficiencies. Dr. Roncarolo's goal at Stanford is to build the teams and infrastructure to move stem cell and gene therapy to the clinic quickly and to translate basic science discoveries into patient treatments. In addition, her laboratory continues to work on T regulatory cell-based treatments to induce immunological tolerance after transplantation of donor tissue stem cells. In Nature Medicine, Dr. Roncarolo recently published her discovery of new biomarkers for T regulatory type 1 cells, which will be used to purify the cells and to track them in patients. She also is investigating genetic chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that occur due to impairment in T regulatory cell functions.
    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)

    Bio

    I am a member of the Stanford Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) faculty, the Stanford Immunology Program and the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine. I have attended on the BMT clinical service since 1997, and I oversee a research laboratory. My current clinical efforts and basic research focus on improving the safety and efficacy of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) which is the most widely practiced and powerful form of cellular therapy. To achieve this goal we address two fundamental issues of HCT – the preparation of the recipient to accept a transplanted hematopoietic graft, and the impact of the graft cellular content on the success of the therapy. We have applied our expertise to develop novel ways to achieve engraftment of blood forming stem cells with the goal to replace chemotherapy and radiation. We have also developed the tools and methods that will allow us to transplant grafts of pure blood forming stem cells with the goal to eliminate potentially harmful passenger cells contained in a blood stem cell graft.
    Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Bio

    Dr.Samuel Strober specializes in the treatment of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. He has practiced rheumatology at Stanford for more than 30 years. He has a special interest in lupus kidney disease. He does not see patients in the Stanford out-patient clinics, but consults on Stanford in-patients with autoimmune disease and inflammatory arthritis. In addition, he consults on the medical tests that are required to determine the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.
    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery and, by courtesy, of Dermatology

    Bio

    Dr. Sunwoo was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. He received his undergraduate degree from Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and his medical degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He completed his training in Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at Washington University. Dr. Sunwoo has been at Stanford University since 2008, and his clinical focus is on the surgical management of head and neck cancer, specifically focusing on melanoma and neoplasms of the thyroid and parathyroid glands. He is a member of the Pigmented Lesions and Melanoma Clinic and the Melanoma Working Group at Stanford. He is also the co-founder of the Stanford Thyroid and Parathyroid Tumor Board. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. Sunwoo is the Director of Head and Neck Cancer Research at Stanford University and the principal investigator of an NIH-funded laboratory in the Stanford Cancer Institute. His research is focused on three primary areas: (1) the immune response to cancer, particularly a tumorigenic population of cells within malignancies called cancer stem cells; (2) the biology and developmental programs of a special lymphocyte population involved in innate immunity called natural killer (NK) cells; and (3) intra-tumor and inter-tumor heterogeneity in head and neck cancer.
    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Cancer and Blood Diseases

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